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  1. #11

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    The only other thing I'd add is that you should first check that your d* camera exposures match up with your film camera. They should, re ISO, aperture etc but we don't know what gear you have so perhaps just do some test before you commit to the studio, in case they differ in some significant way. Should be easy enough to work out a test. Are you using flash or continuous light in the studio? Some form of preview is definitely necessary with flash & still very helpful with continuous.

  2. #12
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    Didn't we just have a thread on this very topic? Please try the forum search function!

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum44/5...flow-idea.html

    As Walt said, "of course." Just don't expect tips on reading histograms etc. on APUG
    Last edited by keithwms; 03-13-2009 at 09:21 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added link....
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  3. #13
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    With my studio lights I find that a flash meter and the modeling lights actually work much better.

    The only time the "digi-Polaroid" helped me was with digi shooting.

    Take a high-key white background for example, any digi will show a "perfect white background" long before the film will. Low-key has the exact inverse of that problem with black backgrounds.

    I actually used a cloth doll that had facial features and worked with one light at a time to get the lighting setup right. For example, set the main at camera f-stop setting plus 1/2 to 1 for fair skin, fill at "main minus" one or two or three depending on how dramatic I want the shot, background for high key white at main plus maybe four stops to get perfect white (this requires lots of space behind the subject to avoid a halo effect).

    During the shoot I leave only the main light's modeling bulb on so I can see how the light will fall.

    Unless you are using a head support and duct-tape on your subject, a Polaroid can't help you with a perfect pose. :rolleyes:
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14

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    Mark,

    my subject for this sunday is an apple, a few film cans, a plate, a fork and a knife. I think they can sit in the same pose for a while :-)
    thanks for the great amount of info. i havent much studio experience so all info is welcome!!!
    but you can be sure, i will be using my light meter and my head rather then staring at a small d*gital screen :-)

  5. #15
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    Yes, but mostly to confirm light ratios as a last test before shooting my 4x5, etc. My studio flash - trust old Speedo Blackline - has nice bright modelling lights, to see where the shadows fall, but they are not proportional in thier output. I set the 2mb digithing for the right exposure and slave trigger the studio flash, with an IR filter over the on camera flash.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #16
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    Have fun!
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #17
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    One further caution - if the digital camera has a smaller than full frame sensor, most likely the digital image will show greater depth of field than your film image.

    Matt

  8. #18

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    [QUOTE=Q.G.;767686]A bit more confidence in your own skills, and/or perhaps a bit more time taken to ponder the scene you are trying to capture, and you do not need Polaroids.

    They only were usefull anyway to show other people who were not sure about your skills that you did indeed know what you are doing.


    not sure about that i believe stanley kubrick used polaroids starting on 2001
    through until his last film,eyes wide shut.
    shooting between 2000 and 5000 shots on polaroid.
    guy bourdin, richard avedon and helmut newton used a lot of polaroids all men who had great technical ability.

  9. #19
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    That's exactly what I plan to do on a studio lighting workshop I'll be going to today. They said to bring a DSLR and lots of cards and batteries. While everyone will be chimping like mad, I'll be unobtrusively switching from a Nikon D200 to a F6. Wonder how that'll go.

  10. #20

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    I always find that the value of polaroid/d****l in the studio environment is to highlight how the "proportional" modeling lights aren't that proportional at all. It's particularly useful in complex subjects where it's often easy to miss shadows thrown by one object on another. I've never found them valuable for judging exposure - other than to highlight substantial errors. Art directors always want polaroids or, today, immediate image display - a bit like a lot of people want to see their medical charts. Doesn't mean they really know what they're looking at - just feel they oughta!

    Tom - do what works for you and enjoy it! (And the apple afterwards!!)

    Bob H
    "Why is there always a better way?"

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