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  1. #21
    lionelpina's Avatar
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    Definitely worth the read.

  2. #22
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Does anyone like sitting in front of photoshop for a few hours? It's not fun. Then again, seeing a new fiber print? Very fun.

  3. #23
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    Great article! And a great blog as well.

    I think it's not as much about film vs d*****l as it is about the "compressed" professional processes we have nowadays.

    The real problem is the notion that a one-man band can achieve the same results as a team of professional specialists while still exercising artistic integrity and quality.

    It just doesn't happen that way.

    Yeah, sure: one guy using all the latest electronic doo-dahs can now do at home what used to require a small army.

    So what? Who asked for that quantity of work? Isn't that guy now stressed out and over-worked? How can he produce best art/best value in those conditions?

    Goes for girls too, so don't ask me to write "person": it's implied.

    Where is it written that quality of the one-man band mass-production output will match the combined results and knowledge of the small army?

    Quantity is not a synonym to quality. Never was, never will be.

    Particularly when what is involved is art produced by one, as opposed to manufacturing and mass-production.

    Confusing the two is what the so-called "d*****l revolution" achieved.

    I think folks are starting to wake up to the reality of unrealistic schedules and over-worked, sub-standard results.

    We'll now see a phase of "return to the origins", before once again folks realize that the middle ground is where the virtue is. So to speak.
    Cheers
    Noons (Nuno Souto)
    Gallery here

  4. #24

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    Ultimately, it doesn't matter what you think or do. You just have to be happy doing it. If you're not, try something different.

    Sadly, the truth of the matter is that digital's popularity has cheapened photography and it will probably never recover. In the film days there was more discontent, with mom and uncle Bob's P&S 110 or APS or whatever clearly unsatisfactory. So much so that seeing a great print made you want to hire that photographer. By comparison the digital shoot-and-erase until you get it right has resulted in far more acceptable photos being made by the masses. And that's all they want.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  5. #25

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    Very good read. I especially liked his analysis of the time spent in digital vs. film. I took up photography because I love to shoot pictures and see the results, not because I want to spend hours "bit-twiddling" digital images in front of a computer monitor.

    I think that it is also about the complexity of the cameras, as well. I'm an amateur, so I don't shoot every day or even every week. I can easily remember f/stop, shutter speed, and focus. What I can't remember are the 9,344 settings on my wife's Canon point and shoot digital. I suspect that 90% of the digi cameras sold are left on the "snapshot" settings, because many of the users don't understand light, depth-of-field, etc.

    Perhaps some people are getting a little fed up with our digital world. The computer deserves it's due (I've made a 35 year career in IT), but there is something very satisfying about fine mechanical Swiss watches, Leica (film) cameras, blued carbon steel and wood firearms, and "real" martinis (gin and vermouth)! Sorry, drifted off topic there... David

  6. #26
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Great article and GREAT blog!!

    Truth ... TRUTH!! from someone who has "gone over, under and through `the hill,`"

    Especially of interest:

    "The economy is bad but you'll make it worse if you buy into the idea that a website takes the place of a face to face meeting. You'll make it stink if you think a Facebook page replaces the real social networking of lunch. And you're business will probably be on life support if you think that everything revolves around how fast you can type on your blackberry. I've just found out for the millionth time the power of human interaction. And it really only happens face to face. Take your medicine and get out there."
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by HouTexDavid View Post
    Perhaps some people are getting a little fed up with our digital world. The computer deserves it's due (I've made a 35 year career in IT), but there is something very satisfying about fine mechanical Swiss watches, Leica (film) cameras, blued carbon steel and wood firearms, and "real" martinis (gin and vermouth)! Sorry, drifted off topic there... David
    Vodka please. Gin is too digital. Why? Think of it, where does vodka come from? Russia. Russians don't use digital. They use Soviet-era metal "tanks" which, when working, create adequate images with their interesting lenses.

    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  8. #28
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    Vodka please. Gin is too digital. Why? Think of it, where does vodka come from? Russia. Russians don't use digital. They use Soviet-era metal "tanks" which, when working, create adequate images with their interesting lenses.

    No, son. Real Martinis are made with Gin. Stirred, not shaken.

    Rather than putting it in a shaker and poisoning the drink with ice, store the Gin in the freezer. That way the Martini stays cold much longer and the Martini is not weaken the ice or melted ice.

    See, now you have learned one of the great truths of the world, grasshopper.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #29

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    OK, I didn't want to do this, but you guys have forced the issue:

    Real Martini recipe is as follows:
    1 part Noilly Prat dry vermouth
    4 parts Tanqueray
    1 dash orange bitters
    Ice
    Stir and pour into chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with lemon twist.

    Put on a little Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, or Chet Baker.
    Sip and enjoy...

    PS... Winston Churchill on vodka:
    "Lovely stuff -- if you've run out of brandy, port, champagn, gin, and Scotch!"

    David

  10. #30
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Recently I have given up the intake of alcohol ... but before I did, I made a breakthrough discovery, in line with "The Most Common element of Beauty is Simplicity":

    Two ounces of Vodka (the "better", the better)
    One splash/ one half ounce of Yukon Jack
    Ice (optional)
    Shake, stir - jump up and down with a vial between your teeth - or not...

    I've named it a "Jackhammer", for one of its ingredients, and its effect.

    Be careful!!! with these!
    Last edited by Ed Sukach; 05-01-2009 at 10:18 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Typo
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

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