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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    So, one could achieve this affect even with a camera having horizontal shutter curtains by rotating the camera from landscape to portrait orientation?
    Yes. However, as the one fellow mentioned, the curtain moving slowly is a necessity.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    On old Graflex shutters, there's a tension setting that controls the speed of the curtain travel and a slit width setting that controls the amount of light let in by the shutter. Some of these shutters had a set of fixed slits on a long single curtain, and some had a single adjustable slit with two curtains, which was a bit less reliable, being more complex.

    On my 5x7 Press Graflex (a camera much like the one Lartigue used in his famous racing photo), it takes up to about 1/5 sec for the shutter to travel the height of the film gate, depending on the tension setting, but there are four slit widths, so at the highest tension with the smallest slit, I can have a shutter speed of 1/1500 sec.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13
    polyglot's Avatar
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    this effect is still visible in current-model high-performance SLRs: you just need faster-moving subjects like propellers to make it visible.

    edit: "Hi, Hoffy!"... I ain't stalking you, only noticed whose thread it was after I posted

  4. #14

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    There is a great animated explanation of the same effect in Jacques Henri Lartigue's image "Grand Prix de Circuit de la Seine", here;

    Jacques Henri Lartigue and his camera
    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ad.php?t=31903

  5. #15
    Schlapp's Avatar
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    I use this effect and its really easy.
    I use my KOWA6 MM which has a 't' setting on the shutter. I have a piece of cardboard cut with a slot in it about 1-2mm wide and edged with fogged sheet film.
    Place the cardboard so that it covers the lens. Open the shutter and then draw the slot across the lens, then shut the shutter. There. Sorted. see here and here .

  6. #16

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    Ha Ha!!! My old car still does leans in the turns, and when going fast (if I can peddle fast enough) it actually leans back, if it wasn't for the gum and duct tape well.... that's another story.

    Mike

  7. #17
    jnanian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schlapp View Post
    I use this effect and its really easy.
    I use my KOWA6 MM which has a 't' setting on the shutter. I have a piece of cardboard cut with a slot in it about 1-2mm wide and edged with fogged sheet film.
    Place the cardboard so that it covers the lens. Open the shutter and then draw the slot across the lens, then shut the shutter. There. Sorted. see here and here .
    very nice!
    the only times i do it is
    with my graflex &C cameras
    it is good to know there are other techniques

  8. #18

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    Interesting. I've often wondered about this effect being possible but never really paid attention to real world examples.

  9. #19

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    I understand what is going on, but still I love those pictures!

    Jeff

  10. #20
    hoffy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    this effect is still visible in current-model high-performance SLRs: you just need faster-moving subjects like propellers to make it visible.

    edit: "Hi, Hoffy!"... I ain't stalking you, only noticed whose thread it was after I posted
    Howdy Poly. Nice to see you over here.

    To be honest, I have never really noticed it with the props. I suppose when ever I have taken aviation pics, I have tried to blur the props, so you can't tell. I also suppose that you would just about need to be face on to get the same effect in that scenario (& of course, we are talking high performance current FILM slr's )

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