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  1. #11
    gmolzahn's Avatar
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    I found this discussion to be very helpful when I starting shooting Efke film:

    http://www.flickr.com/groups/efkeir8...7610674226756/

  2. #12

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    As the others have said, the exposure index for an infrared film varies with the available light. Filter factors likewise vary. Think of it this way: the denser the filter, the more visible light you cut out. Infrared films are sensitive to some visible wavelengths as well as IR, so what you are removing is visible light. What remains to be discovered is just how sensitive to which wavelengths of IR your film is. Bracket like crazy.

    Peter Gomena

  3. #13
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    "Bracket like crazy"

    Can meaningful information be gained from bracketing? I mean if you note the EI of each shot (assuming you are bracketing EI's) can that successful EI become the standard EI for that film? Or is it relative to all the other variables such as brightness, time of day, position of the sun, Summer/Winter light, etc.

    Seems to me each time you want to make an IR photo you could use 5 frames or sheets of film and only hope one works. Perhaps the more familiar you become with the film the fewer wasted frames there may be.

  4. #14

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    I think you need to become more familiar with different scenes.

    The thing is that we do not have a meter to tell us how much IR there is in a scene, except the film we record the scene on.
    So you need to take notes of the type of scene, lighting, and all that. But much of that will be recorded on film already

  5. #15

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    By "bracket like crazy", I mean make a wide range of exposures (say -2 to +2 stops) until you can figure out how the film responds to 1.) the filter and 2.) the amount of IR in an "average" daylight scene. After a couple of rolls or a few sheets, you should be able to reduce the size of the bracket. Take good notes and you will be able to better estimate your exposures under various conditions. It all varies by your latitude, time of day, and weather conditions. It always is a bit of a crapshoot with IR.

    Peter Gomena

  6. #16
    Nikanon's Avatar
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    whatever you do dont get a #87, i use it with rollei ir400 and my factor i use (including reciprocity failure) is 20-stops...

  7. #17
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Well, i plan on bracketing to start until I get used to what whichever film I choose will do with filtration, light quality and subject matter. As mentioned by Bruce, I do not intend to waste EXPENSIVE IR film on trial and error beyond the true 'I have no idea what I am going to get' phase.
    Thank you.
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  8. #18
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikanon View Post
    whatever you do dont get a #87, i use it with rollei ir400 and my factor i use (including reciprocity failure) is 20-stops...
    Then you didn't have the right light to begin with. I have shot many times with the Rollei/#87 combination and it was, at worst 14 stops, but more typically 11 or 12. Despite the longish exposures (typically a second or two but well clear of reciprocity issues), the results are very satisfying.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  9. #19
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    From Digitaltruth: An IR meter

    http://www.digitaltruth.com/store/ca...er-p-1322.html

    I have no idea if this even works but I thought I'd pass along the info

  10. #20

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    I rate Efke IR820 which is 100 ISO at ISO 3. So that is 5 stops. I often bracket a stop above and somtimes below. So as stated above, 6 to 1.5 ISO.


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