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View Poll Results: how many stops would you add to a spotmeter'd white shirt?

Voters
36. You may not vote on this poll
  • 1 stop/zone 6

    2 5.56%
  • 2 stops/zone 7

    20 55.56%
  • 3 stops/zone 8

    10 27.78%
  • other

    4 11.11%
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Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    naeroscatu's Avatar
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    I voted for zone VII as a general assesment but I always measure both my shadows and highlights and determine what is the contrast range so I know how to develop. Also you need to measure your subject (I doubt that would be a shirt) proably the face so you know where it will fall if you open up two stops to put the shirt on zone VII. It all depends on the existing light.
    Mihai Costea

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    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

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  2. #12

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    I agree with ic-racer. Meter and place the skin and let the shirt fall where it may. I would probably meter it and if it was too much, might consider doing a N-1 development.

  3. #13
    keithwms's Avatar
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    This is (always) a matter of priorities in the scene, but indeed my starting point would be 7.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #14
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I agree with ic-racer. Meter and place the skin and let the shirt fall where it may.
    of course that would be optimal, but consider a situation where metering the shirt itself would be more practical than metering anything else, because of the distance to the target, the poor angle of your spotmeter, the fact that they are moving etc. The shirt makes a good target.


    If you measured white skin, I supposed you'd only add one stop. The palm of my hand is always exactly 1 stop brighter than a grey card.
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #15
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (BBBold: BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    I good placement for caucasian skin is zone vi, darker asian skin zone v, african skin zone iv. Has always worked for me.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  6. #16
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    VII in the most simple of scenarios. I'm just as likely to place it elsewhere depending on the scene, what film I'm using, and how I intend to develop given the other information.

    At least you are putting your church time to good use!

  7. #17
    Nikanon's Avatar
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    Get a pentax digital spotmeter, or S.E.I. Exposure meter, again don't set
    yourself up for any zones, let your visualization and technical ability control your tones as well as development, as you visualize

  8. #18
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    VII in the most simple of scenarios. I'm just as likely to place it elsewhere depending on the scene, what film I'm using, and how I intend to develop given the other information.
    Yup! - me too

    Thatís the trick/skill of zoning

    You can only place a couple of tones, the rest end up where ever they happen to fall.

    Knowing which tones to place and which tones to let fall - thatís the skilful bit - and of course not often discussed as people are usually to busy just applying the mechanism of the Zone System :o

    Martin

  9. #19

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    Meter for the Shadows (where detail is needed) and Develop for the Highlights...

    ... (where detail is needed)... unless shooting roll film for which no adjusted development is intended. In that case, meter for the shadows and let the highlights fall where they may... unless shooting chromes, for which you must be more carfeful with the highlights and find a happy balance.

    There's really no correct "all inclusive" answer so I didn't vote.

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