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View Poll Results: how many stops would you add to a spotmeter'd white shirt?

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  • 1 stop/zone 6

    2 5.56%
  • 2 stops/zone 7

    20 55.56%
  • 3 stops/zone 8

    10 27.78%
  • other

    4 11.11%
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Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    What 'zone' for white shirt?

    I was at church today and I started wondering, suppose you spot-metered a person wearing a white dress shirt, or white t-shirt. How many stops would you add to the metered value to account for the shirt's being white rather than grey? 2? 3? 4?

    I'm thinking you would place the shirt at zone 7 so you would add 2 stops.
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #2
    david b's Avatar
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    You would be correct.

  3. #3

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    I'm thinking zone 7, too

  4. #4

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    Depends if the shirt is a important part of picture or if face is or something else.

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    With B&W neg film, I'd process for the shirt to be on Zone VII or two stops over middle grey.

    With color slide film, I'd expose for the shirt to be about 1-1/3 or 1-1/2 stops over middle grey.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6
    Nikanon's Avatar
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    It depends, if in sunlight i would make the highest shades of white from the sun zone VIII, and let the lower values fall, in the shade id do about zone VII or VIII, of course i may make it zone III but this is all depending on my visualization, for me zones are never fixed

  7. #7
    Usagi's Avatar
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    Wirelessly posted (Samsung 2700: SAMSUNG-B2700/XBIB2 SHP/VPP/R5 NetFront/3.4 SMM-MMS/1.2.0 profile/MIDP-2.0 configuration/CLDC-1.1)

    I second what NIKANON wrote. It all depends on visualisation. Perhaps mostly I would use VIII.

  8. #8
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    White shirt in sunlight would be further seperated from the subject's skin tone than in shadow. And their skin would be of more import to me.
    Thank you.
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  9. #9
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    so...bright sunlight or harsh stage lighting....zone 8, shade or flatter lighting maybe zone 7. Cool. When I finally get my spotmeter finished I'll be able try it out.
    f/22 and be there.

  10. #10
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I don't "place" a white shirt, I let it "fall." So, depending on the low areas, it could "fall" on a number of zones under different conditions. (B&W Negative Film)

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