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  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    But it has come up, and should be dealt with adequately.
    Agreed
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  2. #12
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    I do not meter either, most of my night exposures are in the range of two to twenty minutes, so I don't worry about mirror shake, or much of anything more than having a very stout tripod. I am working on a new formula for developing, but what I have done in the past was using Tmax 100 and very dilute D76. (I seem to remember 1:4, but it has been a long time) Basically I just had a list of exposures, and a development scheme that involved a great deal of pulling, and went for it. The exposures are long enough that the shadows get exposed and the highlights don't blow out as bad.

    The trick with Tmax is that the reciprocity characteristics are so much better than traditional films, it can save you at least a stop or two on very long exposures. I am going to work on Acros since it apparently has a little better reciprocity to see how it works as well.

    Here are a couple of examples, excuse the cheesy scanning, that is not one of my strong points:



  3. #13
    jd callow's Avatar
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    I meter. I generally take 2 -3 frames of a subject and all are generally very printable. I test film so I can understand when it will begin to suffer reciprocity failure and how fast it will fail. I use apertures and camera's that I like in general. Although some lenses may be better at night most cameras will be fine and the aperture is subject dependent not time of day. I rely upon a hand held meter sensitive enough for low light for exposure info. I use a Luna Pro SBC (but a sensitive spot meter would be better) and try to place what I'd like to be in the shot within a 5 stop range. I may be as capable as some posting here, but I cannot imagine having any real success without metering. Some of my night shots can be viewed in the APUG gallery if you would like any evidence of the success or failure of my system.

    *

  4. #14
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jd callow View Post
    ...I cannot imagine having any real success without metering.
    I guess I can't imagine doing color without metering either, but this system has worked so well for B&W that I have never wanted to meter with that. I can really see, however, that some of the types of things that tend to cause me trouble, scenes with just moon lighting, neon, especially dark scenes, would be easier to manage with metering. For a more "normal" street light lit city scene, the variations are surprisingly little. The issue for me is that it would open a film testing can of worms that I am not in the mood to open right now.

    I certainly can vouch for the amazing work you do, however, since I have a couple here in my house!

  5. #15

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    I should have clarified, that for black and white work I do not find that I need a meter. If I was shooting colour, and especially transparencies, then I would certainly meter.

  6. #16

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    Interesting post as I also do some night photography.

  7. #17
    Wade D's Avatar
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    Call me old fashioned but I use a slide rule guide that I found in Popular Photography in the early 70's. It lists a bunch of lighting conditions as well as ASA (now ISO) film speeds and recommends shutter speeds and F stops. Good starting points and with bracketing it works well. Oops now I've given away my age LOL.

  8. #18

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    To the OP: IMO, you will do well with an exposure chart, bracketing, a film with good reciprocity maintenance, and plenty of trial and error.

    I might start with T-Max 100 or Neopan 100 for black and white. For color, I'd start with Fuji T64 half or quarter rated and pulled one or two stops to match, or Provia 100F or Astia 100F, similarly rated and developed. You can also cross process the transparency films if you want. (Try them processed -1/2, or -1 if you don't mind a little wonkiness of color.) These films are all excellent in the reciprocity department. T64 will probably give the most "normal" color.

    If you feel like tracking down discontinued films, look for Fuji NPL and/or Portra 100T.

    You can get night photography exposure charts from various sources, like old photography pocket guides and student textbooks.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  9. #19

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    "Low Light and Night Photography" by Roger Hicks is well worth getting hold of.
    Roger used to post on APUG regularly and often came up with good information and contributions to discussions but I've not seen anything from him for a year or more.
    Is he/are you still out there?

    Steve

  10. #20

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    A lot of good advice so far, but may I add, take a torch, a book, insect repellent, and even, if it's not to far or hard to carry, a folding chair. An acquaintance of mine who does a lot of night photography claims these are necessaries, not luxuries.

    The torch is very handy for checking settings and reading the book. I would also add a lens hood to help control flare, unless that is something you are looking for and a back lit timer for long bulb settings if your watch is hard to read or you don't want to use the torch near your camera. Another thing that might help is hanging a heavy weight from the center of your tripod (I use a water bladder, which is easy to fill and empty, on a short rope, others large rocks, or a bag they can add dirt to) to help stabilise the tripod. Also, remember food and drink, you may be out there for a while.

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