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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    Whaa! you mean no instant gratification like with digital? It'll be at least two weeks before we get to develop this particular shoot in class.

    I guess I'll just need to get used to that aspect about shooting film.
    Looks like I better plan on bracketing like crazy and hope for the best.
    No, no, no.
    You better plan on thinking about it like crazy. Find the thing that you need to do to know (!) that you get the shot the way you need it.
    Learn!

    Else you would indeed better use a digital camera, and 'chimp' like crazy.
    'Chimping': a highly visible, tell tale sign, allowing to identify photographers who don't know what they are doing.
    Bracketing is the less visible analog equivalent. Photographers who use meters, and know how to, do not bracket.

    Though it may result in a passing grade, i doubt that your class is about hiding that you don't know what you are doing.
    So try to understand, think, before clicking the shutter. Not afterwards.

    Afterwards is the time to reflect on why things went wrong anyway. And when bracketing saved your butt, you won't. You'll just shrug every frame wasted in bracketing off with a smug "clever of me to bracket, for despite the wasted frames, and me still not knowing what to do the next time - except bracket again - i got the shot!".

  2. #12

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    Roll film developing tanks are dirt cheap. Get one. Develop at home. You may not be able to print but you can read a negative like a print. This will tell you if you need to reshoot. Don't wait.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  3. #13
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    No, no, no.
    You better plan on thinking about it like crazy. Find the thing that you need to do to know (!) that you get the shot the way you need it.
    Learn!

    So try to understand, think, before clicking the shutter. Not afterwards.

    Exactly! and that's why I'm asking all these newbie questions so that I can better understand what I'm doing. I was half-kidding with the bracketing like crazy comment. I'm just a little eager to understand proper exposure techniques so that I can develop good skills and habits and then work on improving them. I'd rather be consistent, rather than hap-hazard, or just lucky.

    Right now, there's just a lot of rules and theoretical stuff. And on top of that, you hear and read things like "learn the rules, then break them."

    Geez Louise!

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that at first, I would just aim the camera, compose what I thought was a good shot, look at the information provided by the camera's meter and adjust. Now I'm thinking more along the lines of type and quality of light; is the subject too contrasty; should I meter a part of the scene, then recompose; should I consider investing in a hand-held meter and learn how to use it. Stuff like that.

    I just need to know if I'm on the right track or floundering

  4. #14
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    Bracketing like crazy is a good idea, if you take detailed notes.

    You need to develop that most important of all photographic tools - your ability to observe and evaluate the scene and the light.

    If you take notes, and then closely examine the negatives and resulting prints in light of the information in your notes, you will quickly learn how to interpret your observations, including meter readings. That will enable you to decrease (but not eliminate) bracketing.

    Matt

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Bracketing like crazy is a good idea, if you take detailed notes.Matt
    ¡Ay, caramba!

  6. #16

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    Asking questions

    Don't ever be afraid to ask a question. I started taking 35mm photos about 25 years ago and I will be the first person to admit that I don't know everything. I think that it is great that anyone is willing to take a photography course, but let me offer a couple of observations. Put more effort into the course than the minimum course requirement and you will get more out of the course than the minimum and you may end up learning. I think that it is important to set goals for yourself so that you can know when you are learning. For instance, you may set a goal like "I want to be familiar with exposure using Ilford HP5+ with my camera." When you can get repeatable results 90% of the time you have taken a step forward. The advise of taking detailed notes is great advice. The notes will help you enormously to get to that place where you can walk out of the darkroom with a good looking print. Take notes of what you are thinking as you evaluate a subject. Take more notes when you develop the film and when you make a print. Don't be afraid to make a mistake. Sometimes we can learn as much from a failed effort as from a masterpiece. Look at the photos made by others to use as a yardstick to compare with your own work. Most important, have some fun with the camera.
    Dave

  7. #17
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    If you intend to expose yourself, I would be SURE that there was NO welding in progress!
    Those errant sparks are !!HOT!!. :rolleyes:
    Last edited by Ed Sukach; 09-16-2009 at 10:53 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Minor Typo
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Bracketing like crazy is a good idea, if you take detailed notes.

    You need to develop that most important of all photographic tools - your ability to observe and evaluate the scene and the light.

    If you take notes, and then closely examine the negatives and resulting prints in light of the information in your notes, you will quickly learn how to interpret your observations, including meter readings. That will enable you to decrease (but not eliminate) bracketing.

    Matt
    !!!!!

    great advice

  9. #19
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post
    I think that it is important to set goals for yourself so that you can know when you are learning. For instance, you may set a goal like "I want to be familiar with exposure using Ilford HP5+ with my camera." When you can get repeatable results 90% of the time you have taken a step forward. The advise of taking detailed notes is great advice. The notes will help you enormously to get to that place where you can walk out of the darkroom with a good looking print. Take notes of what you are thinking as you evaluate a subject. Take more notes when you develop the film and when you make a print. Don't be afraid to make a mistake. Sometimes we can learn as much from a failed effort as from a masterpiece. Look at the photos made by others to use as a yardstick to compare with your own work. Most important, have some fun with the camera.
    Dave
    Excellent - Thank you! Thank all of you. I started out wanting to learn digital photography but something inside said: "You'll learn more about photography going the traditional route with film." So I dropped the digital class and I'm going to focus on film.

    Ironically, I had a similar experience with audio. Started out with analog. Switched to digital but it just wasn't the same. About 4 years ago, I switched to all tube gear. Nothing like listening to some good jazz or classical music through single-ended triodes.

    Tubes Rule! - and so does Film!

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post

    Tubes Rule! - and so does Film!
    As a guitar player for the last 45 years, I can attest to that. All my amps are tube amps. There is nothing like a pair of 6L6's, cranked into overdrive (an effect not for audiophiles but one which guitarists love), making the floor vibrate a little.
    "The beauty and profundity of God is more real than any mere calculation"

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