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  1. #11
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Start with post #3 on this thread. You don't have a spot meter, then go up closely and meter the darkest shadow detail you want and the brightest area and take a reading.

    I used the spot meter on my Nikon f100 and the zoom lens at 300mm [I was NOT going to walk up to the top of Half Dome, but you get the concept], then I took a spot reading of the shadow detail in the densely packed trees. Finally I took a overall reading. It was an SBR of 12 stops. I then adjusted the camera to between the two readings and compared it to the overall reading. If it is close I use the calculated reading, otherwise I take two photographs one using the calculated reading and the other the overall reading. The film captured the SBR without the brights blowing out.
    No spot meter. I have to rely on the in-camera meter. The subject that I had in mind when I read this thread was one of a building shot in morning light (around 8-8:30), clear skies. The building was surrounded by trees with heavy foilage. I had to shoot from across the street which meant that the building was side-lighted by the morning sun. As a result, parts of the building had darker shadows but still showed detail. I don't remeber the settings exactly, but I think I made the shot at 1/1000 @ f3.5, 1/500 @ f3.5, and 1/250 @3.5. And I tried a few other shots stopping down to f8, and f16.

    I probably should have used the DOF preview button - but I was being harrassed by a meter maid at the time, so I was kinda rushed.

    The class requires a choice of Tri-X, FP4, HP5, or Delta 400 or equivalent.
    I shot this scene with HP5. For the remainder of the class, I will be shooting Delta 400.

    The developer will be D-76.

  2. #12
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    You can always take a reading off your hand: sun, shade, partial shade. Also try metering just the side of the building from where you are standing [do each side].

    The best bet is to process the film and see what you have. I do not think that you will need to reshoot, but you may have to.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #13
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    The best bet is to process the film and see what you have. I do not think that you will need to reshoot, but you may have to.
    Whaa! you mean no instant gratification like with digital? It'll be at least two weeks before we get to develop this particular shoot in class.

    I guess I'll just need to get used to that aspect about shooting film.
    Looks like I better plan on bracketing like crazy and hope for the best.
    The other thing is I don't trust the meter in my Minolta X-700. I just get this feeling in my stomach that the roll may be overexposed But heck with 36 frames and maybe limiting the number of subjects I choose to shoot, I may just hit the jackpot

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilmsmaggie View Post
    Whaa! you mean no instant gratification like with digital? It'll be at least two weeks before we get to develop this particular shoot in class.

    I guess I'll just need to get used to that aspect about shooting film.
    Looks like I better plan on bracketing like crazy and hope for the best.
    No, no, no.
    You better plan on thinking about it like crazy. Find the thing that you need to do to know (!) that you get the shot the way you need it.
    Learn!

    Else you would indeed better use a digital camera, and 'chimp' like crazy.
    'Chimping': a highly visible, tell tale sign, allowing to identify photographers who don't know what they are doing.
    Bracketing is the less visible analog equivalent. Photographers who use meters, and know how to, do not bracket.

    Though it may result in a passing grade, i doubt that your class is about hiding that you don't know what you are doing.
    So try to understand, think, before clicking the shutter. Not afterwards.

    Afterwards is the time to reflect on why things went wrong anyway. And when bracketing saved your butt, you won't. You'll just shrug every frame wasted in bracketing off with a smug "clever of me to bracket, for despite the wasted frames, and me still not knowing what to do the next time - except bracket again - i got the shot!".

  5. #15

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    Roll film developing tanks are dirt cheap. Get one. Develop at home. You may not be able to print but you can read a negative like a print. This will tell you if you need to reshoot. Don't wait.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  6. #16
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    No, no, no.
    You better plan on thinking about it like crazy. Find the thing that you need to do to know (!) that you get the shot the way you need it.
    Learn!

    So try to understand, think, before clicking the shutter. Not afterwards.

    Exactly! and that's why I'm asking all these newbie questions so that I can better understand what I'm doing. I was half-kidding with the bracketing like crazy comment. I'm just a little eager to understand proper exposure techniques so that I can develop good skills and habits and then work on improving them. I'd rather be consistent, rather than hap-hazard, or just lucky.

    Right now, there's just a lot of rules and theoretical stuff. And on top of that, you hear and read things like "learn the rules, then break them."

    Geez Louise!

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that at first, I would just aim the camera, compose what I thought was a good shot, look at the information provided by the camera's meter and adjust. Now I'm thinking more along the lines of type and quality of light; is the subject too contrasty; should I meter a part of the scene, then recompose; should I consider investing in a hand-held meter and learn how to use it. Stuff like that.

    I just need to know if I'm on the right track or floundering

  7. #17
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    Bracketing like crazy is a good idea, if you take detailed notes.

    You need to develop that most important of all photographic tools - your ability to observe and evaluate the scene and the light.

    If you take notes, and then closely examine the negatives and resulting prints in light of the information in your notes, you will quickly learn how to interpret your observations, including meter readings. That will enable you to decrease (but not eliminate) bracketing.

    Matt

  8. #18
    lilmsmaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Bracketing like crazy is a good idea, if you take detailed notes.Matt
    ¡Ay, caramba!

  9. #19

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    Asking questions

    Don't ever be afraid to ask a question. I started taking 35mm photos about 25 years ago and I will be the first person to admit that I don't know everything. I think that it is great that anyone is willing to take a photography course, but let me offer a couple of observations. Put more effort into the course than the minimum course requirement and you will get more out of the course than the minimum and you may end up learning. I think that it is important to set goals for yourself so that you can know when you are learning. For instance, you may set a goal like "I want to be familiar with exposure using Ilford HP5+ with my camera." When you can get repeatable results 90% of the time you have taken a step forward. The advise of taking detailed notes is great advice. The notes will help you enormously to get to that place where you can walk out of the darkroom with a good looking print. Take notes of what you are thinking as you evaluate a subject. Take more notes when you develop the film and when you make a print. Don't be afraid to make a mistake. Sometimes we can learn as much from a failed effort as from a masterpiece. Look at the photos made by others to use as a yardstick to compare with your own work. Most important, have some fun with the camera.
    Dave

  10. #20
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    If you intend to expose yourself, I would be SURE that there was NO welding in progress!
    Those errant sparks are !!HOT!!. :rolleyes:
    Last edited by Ed Sukach; 09-16-2009 at 10:53 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Minor Typo
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

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