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  1. #11
    Rinthe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeSeb View Post
    In my first post I was bemoaning the larger size, more awkward handling, and greater complexity of the 758 vs. the 358. They are both very accurate and reasonably rugged, but if I were buying today I'd go with the 358.
    thanks for the clarification.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rinthe View Post
    Hello, i just got this used lightmeter from someone. I have a question about the aperture. It's currently on shutter priority mode right now, when i measure, theres a smaller number that shows up next to the aperture. the manual says its the 1/10 F Stop. But im a little confused, whats the point of that?

    any help would be great. Thanks
    They are there for accuracy, i.e., for picky people like me, who use fractions of f-stops.

    For example, let's say I'm out shooting flowers on a roll of Ilford Delta 100 and so is my friend, Bob. Bob rates his Ilford Delta 100 normally, at E.I. 100. However, I prefer to rate mine at E.I. 160 which is 2/3 of a stop higher than E.I. 100 (or approximately 6/10 of a stop higher, which is the way the meter understands it).

    With the L-358 set at ISO 100, Bob meters the light falling upon a flower, and the meter provides an incident reading of 1/125th @ F/5.6. But because I rate my film at E.I. 160, I could not use that reading because the meter is set for ISO/E.I. 100. Instead of using F/5.6, I would "close down" the aperture 2/3 of a stop to F/7.1.

    If I move the meter's "ISO 1" dial from 100 to 160, the meter will read "F/5.6 & (6/10)" (because we have added 6/10 of a stop to F/5.6) which is F/7.1.

    Let's say that another friend, Carol, joins us. And let's say she rates her film at E.I. 125. In relationship, she rates her film 1/3 higher than Bob but 1/3 lower than me. If we set the meter's "ISO 1" dial to 125, the aperture reading will change to "F/5.6 & (3/10)" which is F/6.3.

    From memory, here are some approximate equivalents:

    F-STOP = SEKONIC READING
    F/2.0 = F/2.0
    F/2.2 = F/2.0 & (3/10)
    F/2.5 = F/2.0 & (6/10)
    F/2.8 = F/2.8
    F/3.2 = F/2.8 & (3/10)
    F/3.5 = F/2.8 & (6/10)
    F/4.0 = F/4.0
    F/4.5 = F/4.0 & (3/10)
    F/5.0 = F/4.0 & (6/10)
    F/5.6 = F/5.6
    F/6.3 = F/5.6 & (3/10)
    F/7.1 = F/5.6 & (6/10)

    F/8.0 = F/8.0
    F/9.0 = F/8.0 & (3/10)
    F/10.0 = F/8.0 & (6/10)
    F/11.0 = F/11.0
    F/13.0 = F/11.0 & (3/10)
    F/14.0 = F/11.0 & (6/10)
    F/16.0 = F/16.0
    F/18.0 = F/16.0 & (3/10)
    F/20.0 = F/16.0 & (6/10)

    ... and so on!

  3. #13
    Rinthe's Avatar
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    thank you brandon for the detailed explanation, i think i'm starting to understand this. but not all cameras have 1/3 stops right? i have a canon ae-1 and it looks like i only get 1/2 stops. Also, theres a switch on the back of l-358 that i can turn on to make it display 1/3 stops. so it'll display, 4.5, 5, 5.6, 7.1 etc.. i guess the 1/10 is for even more precision? maybe sometimes it'll show 1/10 or 2/10? sorry if these are stupid questions, im a newbie

  4. #14

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    Some one asked about the 358in general. I have the 358 and the newer 558 [558??] In my mind the only reason to buy the 358 instead of the 558 is if you are SURE you'll never need a spot meter. he mentioned 1degree adapter for the 358 adds a fair bit of cost to the 358. I don't see the point with the release of the 558. The 358 OTOH is great if you don't need a spot meter.

  5. #15
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    The L358 plus the spot attachment if bought new is much cheaper than the L558 or 758, and if Rinthe only paid $50 for a meter that costs about six times that new, since he/she ? is a newbie, and probably wouldn't know what to do with a spot meter anyway, this was a great buy.
    Ben

  6. #16
    Rinthe's Avatar
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    yeah i can get the 1" lumigrid if i want to use a spot meter, but incident metering is good enough for now

  7. #17
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    Ritthe the Lumigrid is the general reflected light reading attachment that should come with the L358 not the spot attachment, check the instruction book.
    Ben

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rinthe View Post
    thank you brandon for the detailed explanation, i think i'm starting to understand this. but not all cameras have 1/3 stops right? i have a canon ae-1 and it looks like i only get 1/2 stops. Also, theres a switch on the back of l-358 that i can turn on to make it display 1/3 stops. so it'll display, 4.5, 5, 5.6, 7.1 etc.. i guess the 1/10 is for even more precision? maybe sometimes it'll show 1/10 or 2/10? sorry if these are stupid questions, im a newbie
    In fact MOST cameras do not have 1/3 stop indcators.
    1/10 stop change is nice if you're marketing a meter but most people can't use it anyway since neither your shutter or lens is calibrated to use it. Any use of 1/10 is by gosh and by golly or wishful thinking. To explain it a little more easily(?) if the indicated reading is Xsec@f2.2 you're just opening the lens on the camera to f2 & a little bit.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    In fact MOST cameras do not have 1/3 stop indcators.
    1/10 stop change is nice if you're marketing a meter but most people can't use it anyway since neither your shutter or lens is calibrated to use it. Any use of 1/10 is by gosh and by golly or wishful thinking. To explain it a little more easily(?) if the indicated reading is Xsec@f2.2 you're just opening the lens on the camera to f2 & a little bit.
    I use mine a great deal with studio strobes and as Mike Seb wrote many of the modern ones have the ability to adjust the light output in 1/10 of a stop increments, and since the light several flashes is cumulative it enables precise exposure setting. The full title of the meter is the Sekonic L -358 Flash Master , and I find it to be one of the best flasmeters i've ever used.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 09-08-2009 at 02:45 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  10. #20

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    Most newer cameras (in the past 10 years or so) do have 1/3 stop increment for both shutter speed and aperture.

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