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Thread: Meter accuracy

  1. #11
    Eising's Avatar
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    I have the same meter. It took me a while to figure out how to use it properly. What I usually do is slide the disc over, and measure the light source (e.g. the sun or sky) then I compensate for whatever light my subject is in. If my subject is in the shade, I compensate about four stops.

    I wouldn't worry too much about the zone system with an incident meter, as it is nearly impossible to meter the zones without a spot meter.

  2. #12

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    If memory serves me correctly. The back of your hand, talking about a Caucasian person, is in Zone VI. If you expose for Zone V or 18 % gray, your exposure will be off by one stop. Also, if you have a point and shoot digital camera, you can set the ISO to your film speed and use that as a general light meter. I had to do that today as all four of my meters, two old Pentax spot meters and two old Weston II meters, are either dead or needing calibration.

    One person stopped by while I was setting up my Crown Graphic and he showed me an app on his iPhone that can give you an exposure using the iPhone's camera. Granted, I don't know how accurate that app is. I also asked him, how accurate it was and I don't think he had relied on it for his exposures.
    Personally, I prefer an analog meter over a iPhone app.

  3. #13
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eising View Post
    I have the same meter. It took me a while to figure out how to use it properly. What I usually do is slide the disc over, and measure the light source (e.g. the sun or sky) then I compensate for whatever light my subject is in. If my subject is in the shade, I compensate about four stops.

    I wouldn't worry too much about the zone system with an incident meter, as it is nearly impossible to meter the zones without a spot meter.
    You can "Zone" with an Incident Meter

    See Phil Davis - "Beyond the Zone System"

    Martin

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose LS Gil View Post
    If memory serves me correctly. The back of your hand, talking about a Caucasian person, is in Zone VI.
    Regardless of race, the PALM of the hand is fairly consistent in brightness at approximately Zone VI.

    I metered my own palm vs. 18% gray card and measured precisely +1.3EV difference.

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    On two Easter APUG get together (UK) a few of us tested some meters, and we found the readings to be remarkably similar, not even 1/3 of a stop different, that was Gossen, Sekonick, Pentax & Minolta.

    My own meters (UK) a Luna Pro SBC used with the incident light cone cone and as Pentax Spotmeter V, or capital Spot meter, and this year a Minolta gave the same reading, as did the CDS meter of my Yashicamat 124. My DSLR amtched as well

    Ian

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mirko Lazzarin View Post
    Hi Denis,
    Reflective as well..Unless I am doign something wrong, but once you slide the sphere you have a reflective reading
    About Sunny 16 rule...I live in Ireland, this means I have to wait long for a bit od sun
    Yes sunny f11 at best and at this time of year probably only between 11:00am and 3:00pm or 10:00am and 2:00pm tomorrow when the clocks go back an hour.

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
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    I developed, as always, my films (Fomapan 100 in rodinal 1+25)...and the result was almost a disaster with the films underexposed, I'd say at least 2 stops.
    This is what you get for relying on ANY meter. If the new meter recommended exposures 2 stops different than the old one, you should have noticed. If you didn't, then apparently you don't interpret your light meter's reading and just plug its recommendations in your camera. You should always take the reading your light meter gives you about as seriously as a politician's promise. It always needs interpretation.
    f/22 and be there.

  8. #18

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    All light meters have their own foibles. I've had a L308 for about ten years and previous to that I've used Gossens, Westons, Leicameters and several more that I don't recall. I've got the L308 wet in the rain and kicked it across several studio floors (black floor & black meter = bad combination) but it still comes back for more. I don't wish to sound rude, but it may be that you've set the meter wrongly or that your not pointing it at the tonal areas you're trying to measure accurately - you may, for instance, need to get closer to the area you're measuring.

    It's also possible that your new meter is inaccurate, but I doubt it. More likely, you've established a 'zone system' that works with your old Weston but no longer holds with your new meter. For a zone system to work it requires a 'closed system' with consistent components. It may be that, in setting up your old system, your Weston was consistently inaccurate (compared to standard) and that you then - unknowingly - compensated for this in development... A zone system may work well within it's own confines but fall to pieces when you inject a new component ; it could be a new film or a new camera, or a new light meter or a combination of all three...

    I suggest you discard the figures you've derived in your old system but, using the same methodology, start again - set up a new set of calibration tests and see where that takes you.

    Regards
    Jerry

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose LS Gil View Post
    One person stopped by while I was setting up my Crown Graphic and he showed me an app on his iPhone that can give you an exposure using the iPhone's camera. Granted, I don't know how accurate that app is. I also asked him, how accurate it was and I don't think he had relied on it for his exposures.
    Personally, I prefer an analog meter over a iPhone app.
    And you do good in doing so. This iPhone App usually is at least one stop off. Sadly one can never tell wether it is one too bright or too dark this time.

    Kind regards

    P.S.: Hello APUG

  10. #20
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    This is just an observation- but I think it has to be said, many people who are getting unacceptable exposed results from their light meters automatically blame their light meter and it's accuracy not their lack of understanding of the basic principals of exposure, and how to use the instrument.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 12-01-2010 at 09:36 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

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