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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    Was wondering the same thing recently. If deving LF by inspection (which I'll be doing soon as a newbie), I assume I should spot shadows, place them on zone three, then dev for the highlights?
    You are correct in your exposure and development considerations. Typically the EI of a film is not a stationary number. As one moves into expansion of contrast on a film the EI increases and as one moves into contraction of contrast on a film the EI decreases.

    For instance with Efke PL100 I would rate the film at EI 50 at a SBR of 7 (normal). If I had a scene with a SBR of 8 (N minus 1 appr.) I would still rate the film at 50, When I get into a SBR of 9 (N minus 2 appr) I would rate the film at 30. On the other hand at SBR of 6 (N plus 1 appr) I would rate the film at 80 and for a SBR of 5 (N plus 2 appr.) I would rate the same film at 100.

    Regarding low value placement, John Sexton is reportedly to have said that "nothing lives on Zone III". I would guess from that comment that he doesn't place his values at III.

    I use incident metering exclusively today. I have a spot meter but just don't use it anymore.

  2. #12
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    I use a spotmeter and read the darkest shadow which is placed on Zone IV and I read the brightest highlight to determine the contrast range and develop accordingly, for example if the contrast range is 7 stops and the highlight falls two stops above Zone VIII I reduce development by 2 stops and increase exposure by one stop to bring the highlight back to Zone VIII. The increase in exposure is to compensate for the information lost in the shadows as a result of reducing development. I don't know if John Sexton places shadows on Zone IV, I suspect he does but I do know that Bruce Barnbaum does. I understand that any blue light present causes the meter to give the wrong values particularly in the shadows hence the need to compensate by one stop. It works for me.

  3. #13
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I point my incident meter at my camera from my subject's position.
    Yup. Pretty simple, isn't it? Although I do sometimes point the meter at the light source instead of the camera.

  4. #14
    Juraj Kovacik's Avatar
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    scaning scene with camera - Nikon FM3A - meter and then usually set up exposure for shadows...jk

  5. #15
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    Sunny 16 unless I'm shooting [color=green]Auto[/color]. Or rather "Sunny 16 with variations" e.g. "shadows -3 stops" and "indoors is usually 1/30 f/4 or f/2.8 most places at ISO 400"

    I recommend a quick perusal of John Brownlow's Non-Anxious Exposure Guide for all B&W shooters.

    I also have a little excel spreadsheet I made for myself a long while back, with typical exposures at ISO 400 and typical situations... "sunset 1/125 f/8" etc. Wish I could find the file I made it from, but I've had a (rarely consulted) printout of it (along with a DoF chart for my Contax G lenses) in my wallet for years.

    I am also not afraid of black, heh

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  6. #16

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    For B&W I set my spot meter to the mfg rated ISO speed, point it at the darkest area where I want texture. The reading is my exposure. When I use auto metering to handle changes in illumination I'll turn the compensation dial until the in-camera meter agrees with my spot meter. I'll also scan the scene with the meter first to choose a film and developer.

    When shooting slide film I meter at the ISO speed with the expectation that I will have 2 stops of texture below, and some amount above which depends on the film. For Astia, for example, I expect 2.5 stops of texture above the reading.

    Works every time. Like magic.

  7. #17
    DrPhil's Avatar
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    I read Les' post with great interest as I sometimes do place my shadows on Zone IV. However, my thinking was not from how my meter might respond to different colors of light. Typically I think of shadows belonging on zone III. However, my goal behind exposing any negative is to assure that all of the important detail is recorded on the negative. Thus, a bit of over exposure and over development will be okay. This really all comes back to the old adage: expose for the shadows, develop for the highlights.

  8. #18
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Okay, I admit it, I'm a philistine!

    Most of the time I leave my F80 in 3D matrix mode and trust it. If I'm in doubt then I'll find some grass or tarmac and spotmeter it (again with the camera) but, to be honest, I'm not much good at finding a midtone.

    If it's a critical shot (and I can) then I'll incident meter using a Weston Master from the subject aiming back at the camera, but this usually confirms the F80's reading.

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