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  1. #1

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    This kind of goes with the other question I posted. I find it interesting the number of ways people meter a scene. There is the BW crowd and the Color crowd.

    What method do you get your good exposures, and is it based on some mathematical formula.

    I'll start.

    BW-reflective meter the darkest portion then the lightest. Place the darkest area without important stuff on ZOne 2 and expose for that. I think I develope for the highlights. In the past this worked well with silver printing on VC paper. I don't do that any more so I don't know how what I am doing will work with the ALT processes I am just starting.

    Color. Usually hold the incident meter above my head and expose that way. In difficult situations I spotmeter my bag(black) in even light and drop 2 stops, and cross my fingers. Since I started this I am happy to say I have missed very few exposures. If I use a filter I meter through the filter. LF film is too expensive for me to bracket.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #2

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    BTZS method. I use the EV value of my meter to measure the lightest and darkets part of the scene where I want to hold detail. This gives me the scenes Subject Brightness Range (SBR). For each SBR, as a result of earlier testing of film, developer and paper, I have different development times that apply.
    Francesco

  3. #3
    Ole
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    Three or so different ways, depending on camera, film and subject:

    BW / LF: spotmeter shadows, check highlights and midtones to see what will happen if shadows are placed on zone III. Adjust exposure until feasible with home-mixed chemicals. Then forget my planned development and develop by inspection anyway. Or stand development in FX-2 if I have truly no idea of what it is.

    Colour: Aim incident meter backwards over my shoulder, set speed and aperture accordingly (outdoors).

    Old Folders: "Debatometer"! Look at the sky (or other light source), guess how strong the light is compared to "sunny 11" (empirically determined for 60° north latitude), open up for clouds, maybe close down for old uncoated lenses (less contrast due to flare), wiggle the dials a bit, look at the sky again, guess what the longest time I can hold the camera still is, set the aperture I want, look around for nice solid support. This sounds nowhere near as haphazard as it really is, but I get a surprising number of well-exposed negatives this way! I justify it as being "historically correct". Or should that be "hysterically incorrect"?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #4
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    My normal method for ....? Well, the "usual" is to keep the raincoat unbuttoned but held close around me; to walk in front of an unsuspecting ...
    Wait ... Do you mean "Photographic Exposure"?

    I use a lot of Incident metering in the Studio, with the Gossen UltraPro and the "Studio Incident Metering" attachment. That has proven to be the most accurate method, being independent of the "brightness" - or lack of, of the subject.

    I'll use "reflective" - including "spot", metering where I cannot get to the position of the "subject.

    Did I read something here about a different mathematical algorithm used in determining the relation between "Incident" and "Reflective-Spot" metering? :
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #5

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    Mark,

    for slide film candids, I prefer incident metering. For CN and all modern B&W-Film, I prefer shadows on Zone III. In controlled light situations on slides, I usually do multispot metering. I never meter thru filters, I always use the given filter factors.

  6. #6
    Dave Miller's Avatar
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    For outside shots I go along with the “sunny 16” rule down rated for England to “sunny 11” as Ole. Roughly equal to 1/125th at f11 in bright sunshine with 100 EI film. Adjust for location of sun, in front of or behind cloud, do some mental gymnastics regarding adjustments for filters, and then check the result with my Weston Euromaster lightmeter. If the two reading don’t coincide; then I disregard the Weston’s. For inside work I set the flash to “auto-bounce” and let it get on with it.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  7. #7
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    for black and white, i spot meter important shadows and place on zone iii - for most situations, this is fine with my developer choice. Sometimes, if the highlights fall well above zone viii based upon my shadow exposure, I pre-expose the frame to boost shadow detail with a transulcent filter and then expose to place the highlights on zone viii.

    When i do shoot colour transparencies, i rely upon a 4 stop detail range and use nd grads to control highlights.

  8. #8
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    As a complete amateur I use the "sunny 16" rule at 7000 ft elevation in Colorado. I frequently check this with a Pentax digital spotmeter using mostly middle tones such as folage. If I adjust "fudge" the settings it is toward overexposure with negative film and under with color slides. With color slides in 35 I just use the incamera meters in a Nikkormat EL or Nikon F2. I also use the recommended ASA/ISO and correct for the appropriate filter factors. While I will admit to no formal film testing I occasionally adjust my developement times. I find that my negatives look appropriate and print well at grade 2 or 3 for average subjects and my slides are not "blown out" but have good highlight detail.

    (As I said - This is from the amateur side)
    John Harvey
    Colorado Springs, CO
    harveyje@usa.net

  9. #9
    Sean's Avatar
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    Was wondering the same thing recently. If deving LF by inspection (which I'll be doing soon as a newbie), I assume I should spot shadows, place them on zone three, then dev for the highlights?

  10. #10

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    Sean, that is correct, most of the time, and works well for expansion or plus development. For minus development i usually add another stop (or two if really getting into minus) and then develop. It works for me, maybe not for others....
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

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