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  1. #41
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Most people I know just put it under their arms.

    I suppose in South Texas, heat is more of a problem much of the time, except when a norther comes in.

    The studios where I worked became really dependent on it.

  2. #42

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    Hi bowzart... yeah, I know some use/used the stuff. I just never really liked it. It never helped me one bit regards to exposure. In fact, it steered me wrong more often than not. But I was comparing apples to oranges... I shot B&W and used the Zone System and I had a very good grip on my chosen mediums... Agfapan 25 or 100 in Rodinal 1:50 or 1:100 with slight variations in agitation techniques and toned in Selenium. Or... maybe I was just too picky.

  3. #43
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    Minor White used a lot of it in his ZS workshops to demonstrate. It worked pretty well, actually, limited as it was.

    I did like it. I shot a massive job on location in the eastern Washington desert, where there was no darkroom. Archaeological dig - artifacts. As it was very important to show the flaking and wear, needed to see the results right away. All I had was trays and a bathtub, and sodium sulfite. Worked well.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    Minor White used a lot of it in his ZS workshops to demonstrate. It worked pretty well, actually, limited as it was.

    I did like it. I shot a massive job on location in the eastern Washington desert, where there was no darkroom. Archaeological dig - artifacts. As it was very important to show the flaking and wear, needed to see the results right away. All I had was trays and a bathtub, and sodium sulfite. Worked well.
    Ahh... type 55 with a decent albeit it grainy neg. A bit of a different story as the negs grant you reprieves... second chances for better detail and exposure make "perfection" far less of an issue... get a decent print... get a very decent enlargement. Not really something for Chimping though, is it? As I recall, a slightly overexposed neg (slightly lighter print) offered the best results (better shadow detail) and the chemicals depleted before blocking highlights (like stand or two bath development) ... decent tonal retention but lousy grain, as I recall. Yes, very useful in some conditions such as the archiological digs you mentioned. But, IMO, you were only quasi-Chimping.
    Last edited by Mike1234; 12-24-2009 at 10:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #45

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    If youre using youre meter in incident mode you should not have to compensate its reading. Also what film are you using? I develop tri-x 400 in D76 1-1 for 8.5 min at 70*. I feel you may be using youre meter in incident mode and youre proccesing times may be way off. Stop baths usually only require 30 seconds and a rapid fix 3 to 5 minutes. Also are you using D76 straight or 1-1 ? Negs as dense as you say yours are can be caused by over exposure and or over development. Hope this helps you. Don

  6. #46

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    Donima - That film was 120 pro Tri-X 320 film developed in D76 1:1 @ 68F for 14 mins, 2 rolls in one double tank, 30 seconds initial agitation, 10 secs every minute for the following 13 1/2 mins. NOW..According to the D76 processing chart, there are no suggested times for double tank processing, only single for 120 TriX 320, so my 14 mins of developing was a rough estimate based on the relationships between single and double tank times for other types of film.. Was I wrong in estimating? Was I wrong in processing two rolls at a time if there are no suggested times? I didn't think so.. But maybe I'm being naive.

    (Keep in mind, I had only 2 years or so darkroom experience in college, which was over 2 years ago.. and only recently got myself set up in my parents basement now developing negs again. Soon I'll have enough money saved to get full darkroom set up so I can start printing! But as of now, I do not.)

    The rest of my processing goes as follows: (in previous post I may have improperly recalled my times..I have the sheet I wrote up in front of me now..)
    after dumping developer:
    -Sprint stop bath 1:9, agitate for first 30 secs, then 5-10 secs every 30 seconds for 2 mins
    -dump stop-
    -Ilford rapid fixer 1:4 - agitate first 30 secs then 10 seconds every min for 8-10mins
    -return fixer to "2nd round" bottle
    -h20 wash, dumping repeatedly for 2-3 mins roughly at 70F
    -Hypo clear 1:9 1-2 mins (I made no note of agitations.. DOH!)
    -Final h20 wash, 5 mins dumping repeatedly
    -30 seconds of kodak photo flo 200 (1:200)
    -hang on rope above sink with clothespins on all four corners of film till dry

    If anyone sees unnecessary procedure, improper times, etc.. Let me know, it's been a while!!

  7. #47

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    Hi,

    Stop bath just 30 sec
    Ilford rapid fixer 1:4 just 2 min
    HCA not necessary with Ilford rapid fixer
    After th fixer 5 min wash

  8. #48

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    juanito - Hypo clear agent isn't necessary?? but Doesn't it assure the fixer is completely cleared? or is there no hypo in the type of fixer I'm using?

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deit39 View Post
    juanito - Hypo clear agent isn't necessary?? but Doesn't it assure the fixer is completely cleared? or is there no hypo in the type of fixer I'm using?
    Hypo Clearing Agent ("HCA") makes the washing process more efficient, and saves a lot of water.

    Without HCA, you need to wash for quite a bit longer, but the end result (HCA plus shorter wash as compared to no HCA plus extended wash) is essentially the same.

    Matt

  10. #50

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    Acording to Ilford you don't need HCA if you are using Ilford rapid fixer because it is a non hardening fixer.

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