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  1. #11

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    Shoot for the ambient light, and let the light from the arc fall where it may. You will not have detail in the arcs anyway so overexposing them will be fine.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  2. #12
    jp80874's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hec View Post
    I would be hesitant to use exposures longer than 1 sec. because I expect to get a sharp texture of the welder's mask and in my experience people hardly hold still for longer than 1/15, once I get into 1/8 I start to see a faint blur at the print. But I will give it a try to see it for myself.
    ).
    A tripod will take out your part of the movement. Anything of the welder's that doesn't move will be tack sharp.

    John

  3. #13

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    Ambient/Flash control

    Remember the little formula that the aperture controls the light from the flash and the shutter controls the ambient background light. If your flash has a set output, adjust your aperture for correct flash (foreground) exposure and fiddle up and down the shutter speed range to manipulate the duration and strength of the arc trails.
    It helps use up your film!

  4. #14
    Denis R's Avatar
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    PERSONAL recommendations

    filter recipe
    uv
    polarizer

    or auto darkening welding helmet

    the one I use is
    huntsman AutoView 9.5 shade hi sens short delay

    usually wear Carhartt coat or winter weight BDU

    make test exposures with D***tal
    Kodak Duaflex II with kodet lens
    N75 N8008s D60
    Yashica - D
    Only a photographer knows the true value of infinity

  5. #15
    jp498's Avatar
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    The person doing the welding will not likely move much at all; part of making good welds is being steady and gentle. Their hand and welding stick might move, but that's about it. This may help for the long exposures. If you're near the welding, don't wear synthetic clothing, and wear something over your eyes even if it's not a auto darkening mask. From several feet away for a short time, goggles made for acetylene welding will provide both visibility and short term protection if an auto darkening mask isn't provided or isn't in the budget.

  6. #16
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    If you've ever been out in the desert or beach with a camera, you will be aware of the damage fine sand can do - Treat a welder's environment the same. When they pick up a grinder, the dust will get everywhere and if your gear is in the line of fire, particles will get embedded in the body and lens.
    Has anyone suggested a UV filter yet - Use one. It will protect the front of your lens.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis R View Post
    filter recipe
    uv
    polarizer

    or auto darkening welding helmet

    the one I use is
    huntsman AutoView 9.5 shade hi sens short delay

    usually wear Carhartt coat or winter weight BDU

    make test exposures with D***tal
    +1, When you don't have a helmet on wear dark sunglasses, Sunscreen can help, but I've gotten a sun burned even after as little as 5 minutes of Mig Welding.

    If you meter for ambient, get the welder to strike briefly instead of running a long bead. If your after the sparks flying off, this will probably give you the best effect, if he doesn't even really weld anything, jsut does a bunch of short strikes (not tacks or beads)

  8. #18
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    As a person who did TIG & MIG welding in the Navy, please be careful, especially with your eyes.

    Protect them.

    So as you can enjoy a long life seeing your world.

    Have a wonderful weekend.
    Bill Clark

  9. #19

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    I'm rather new to welding, and as an asthma sufferer I had to go with TIG as it produces very little smoke (soldering smokes more). It also doesn't throw sparks (unless something goes wrong and I've done that once or twice) so it's not as spectacular from a photography perspective. (Makes great welds though.) Other processes that use flux coated rods or wire will produce significant smoke. That will effect the image you record and it might be what you want or it might not. Just keep that in mind.

  10. #20
    hec
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    the negatives are drying now... they look promising. Tomorrow I'll print a few and share them with you.

    I used a 135mm lens to have some space between the welder & myself. During the shooting it helped me to take off the finder of my F2, easier on my eyes, so I was looking down at the camera and wearing a cap.

    I did a lot of bracketing and from what I see on the negatives the best ones were exposed between 1/8 & 1/30 @ f8 & f5.6.

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