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  1. #11
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Digicam exposure metering is NOT an adequate substitute for a handheld meter. They are calibrated for the chip in the digicam. I have seen this first-hand when shooting product shots with a digi and comparing it against my handheld flash meter, which I know from experience is accurate with my film shooting. Set the camera and the handheld meter to ISO 100. Take the exposure reading from the flash meter, set the camera accordingly, chimp, and voila - 1+ stops underexposed. I've seen this phenomenon not only with my old Olympus E-1, but a variation on the theme also happens with my Canon 5D. I was also in a portraiture class where most folks were shooting digital - we all used the same hand-held light meter, but five of the eight of us had to set something different (plus or minus) from the handheld meter reading to get an appropriate exposure on our cameras. This is a dirty little secret of digital photography - ISO 100 is not necessarily ISO 100. If you want to use something other than an in-camera meter for metering, get a handheld meter from a reputable manufacturer like Sekonic or Minolta. Get one that can be calibrated. Do some exposure tests, record your results, then calibrate your handheld meter to your process. It's not difficult, just a bit tedious.

  2. #12
    Mats_A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Digicam exposure metering is NOT an adequate substitute for a handheld meter. They are calibrated for the chip in the digicam.....
    You are of course right about this, but as long as the error vis a vis the film is consistent you can easlily compensate for that. My D40 overexposes about 2/3 a stop but does this consistently so I know how to compensate. Just like using a non-calibrated meter.

    Greetings from one who some day hope to own his own Sekonic l-508.

    r

    Mats
    Digital is for communication, film is for documentation.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiopirilo

  3. #13

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    I actually do not use the built in CW,Matrix or Spot meter in a digital camera as the meter. I use the imaging sensor in the digital camera as the meter. It happens that at ISO100 the sensor in my camera is very close otherwise I can simply use a compensation factor.
    What I do is to set the digital camera on manual mode. Make an estimate setting and take a shot. Review the image and make neccessary adjustment then take another shot. After I get a good shot with the digital, transfer the reading over to the film camera. I always use the digital camera at ISO100 then make the neccessary compensation if the film in use isn't ISO100.

  4. #14

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    If you put that camera in CW mode and let it determine the exposure, do you get significantly different results?
    If not, no need to first guess and then see whether your guess panned out on the LCD screen.
    If so, you should get a better camera.

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