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  1. #1

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    Changing ISO of film

    Hi, I started taking photos with a canon at-1 and I did put a 400 ISO film, but I set 100 ISO in the camera propeties. What happen if I change the ISO about 100 to 400, does the film will ruin? Or should I keep the 100 ISO?

  2. #2

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    Is this B&W or color? Are you developing it yourself?
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

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    You may as well stay with the choice you had for the rest of your roll. Just tell the developer to pull one stop (pulling two is probably unnecessary, I think). It'll be overexposed but probably fine. Print films can handle one or two stops of overexposure.

    P.S. I assume that you are talking about print film, not slide film, right?
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #4

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    Which film were you using?

    Some films behave quite well under pull processing and this is a technique often used in motion picture to increase contrast.

  5. #5

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    Thank you for all your replies. I did change the iso from 100 to 400, hope the film dont get ruin. Im really new in this, Im experimenting and thats a nice way to learn things. The film is a kodak 400/27 color film. Im dying to see the final results I feel very excited.

  6. #6

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    one time in a studio photography class, I shot a half of a roll of portra 400 at 100. I changed the aperture of the camera to get the correct exposure as soon as I noticed it. When I got the film developed, I couldnt tell a difference in the prints. I'm sure the lab adjusted the overexposed prints using a method not suitable for discussion here


    Your film should be fine. At the very least, you'll have plenty of shadow detail in the overexposed negatives

    Dont worry about it too much. I tend to overlook something simple like that at least one or two rolls a month
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  7. #7

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    thank you, I was worried. do you always feel excited to see your pictures? It's my first time taking pictures and Im very excited

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    Quote Originally Posted by pacoev View Post
    thank you, I was worried. do you always feel excited to see your pictures? It's my first time taking pictures and Im very excited
    I just finished reversal processing a roll of FP4+ film (processing the B&W negatives as slides), and I was excited/anxious about seeing the slides, especially during the final wash. I just started reversal processing a few weeks ago, so I'm new to it. Taking them out of the wash to dry still feels like when I processed my first B&W negtives a few years ago. It's very exciting to look at them in front of the light when I take them off the reel. I cant wait for them to dry so I can mount and project them

    Good luck with your roll. I hope it turns out fine (I'm sure it will)
    "Gotta little problem with personal space, and I've been pounding the Jager. My breath and behavior have been driving the patrons away" -"Whipped Cream" by Ludo


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  9. #9

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    Thank you! I will try to show some shoots.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by pacoev View Post
    Thank you! I will try to show some shoots.

    as far as I understand it (from the theory only), the ISO of a given film is "indicative" only: all things being perfect, it will result in a negative placed around the average or "mid-gray" point on the film's characteristic curve (or density range).

    Using the film as if it were rated higher ("increasing" the nominal ISO or "pushing" the film) results in the negative densities migrating towards the toe of the films characteristic curve: i.e. a loss of shadow detail. This can be "restored" to some extent, by increasing the time the film is in the developer (or using a more active developer). This used to be a relatively common practice among professionals and keen amateurs.

    Using the film as if it were rated lower (pulling it) results in the densities migrating to the "shoulder" or upper end of the film's density range, giving "blown" highlights and well exposed/overexposed shadows. The film may be treated by reducing the time spent in the developer. Unfortunately, truly blown highlights will probably be blank and unrecoverable.

    In both cases, there are, also, corresponding actions to be taken in the Printing stage (with B&W or colour negative film)

    In either case, the colour balance is likely to be affected in unexpected ways (colours not true to life), as a large variation from "normal" exposure will affect the film's colour layers differentially.

    If developing the film yourself, the thing to do is to expose the film using the same ISO setting throughout, then you can deal with it uniformly in development (or tell your lab the problem and they can deal with it). If you realize you have made an ISO setting error and change halfway through the film, you get the worst of both worlds.

    I expect, in your case, you overexposed (at least some) of your film by 2 stops. This would "blow" your highlights, give you well to overexposed shadows and result in washed-out (pastel) colour rendition.

    Colour negative film has a greater tolerance for exposure divergence from the norm than does colour reversal (slide) film.
    Last edited by Galah; 05-12-2010 at 08:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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