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  1. #71
    SilverGlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexhill View Post
    Being visible with gear, offer some open houses, or start making cyanotype murals outside with large groups. You can't make someone who doesn't care want to learn. But if your doing something with a cool camera (4x5 or something) you will get quite the crowd and its a perfect platform for explaining how cool photography is.

    I use a couple hooks with kids at a camp I work at. I talk about building images with your bare hands. The good 'ol DIY ethic.

    Controlling the camera : pitch goes something like this "Ever get bad photographs? Its because your smarter than that digital camera, you can control a film camera totally and make the images you want.

    Displaying prints and demo-ing printing is the biggest hook. There is nothing more magical than seeing a latent image develop. You can talk about 'crafting the light with your bare hands' (aka burning and dodging ) .

    To contradict myself, controlling a camera is crazy hard and lots of work. Why not offer a holga class? Talk about how this 20$ plastic camera can make beautiful dreamy images. Its probably the quickest and most painless introduction to photography. Lots of 'meh! lets try it'. Keeping it simple can be a great hook because alot of people are not technically oriented and that is a huge turn off.

    Being excited about photography is perhaps the most important skill in getting others to want to try it.
    Why do you assume that a digital camera is always full auto, and cannot be used in manual mode?

    All the things you wrote that you can do manually with a film camera, one can also do with a DSLR, in full manual mode.

    I think this "I hate digital" mentality will do more to turn people off to film because is shows the worst side of us film shooters, as people that are irrational, threatened, and insecure with our choices in photography.

    I find it far more beneficial to sell film as another way to do photography, to express one's self visually. To damage the other medium in order to prop up my choice of medium will always come across subjective and irrational.

    When I'm asked why I shoot 35mm film instead of a DSLR, I give reasons that are:

    1. True
    2. NOT emotional.
    3. NOT religious.
    4. As another way to express myself visually.
    5. Devoid of attacking digital.

    And here they are:

    Film provides 1-2 stops wider dynamic range.
    Film shows lens diffractional issues less then digital.
    Film shows richer tonal graduations.

    There are of course other reasons to shoot film, but if you approach it from a pragmatic, true, and unemotional perspective people are much more likely to listen and give film a try.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

  2. #72

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    I've already convinced a few friends to at least try film photography and 2 actually loved it and never shot digital again. How did I do this? Very easy... I just gave them one of my old, manual 35mm SLRs and a roll of film for a few days and some basic instructions. Afterwards I made some proper prints of the best pictures for them.

    Most people really like the workflow of setting aperture and shutter speed, manual focusing and the feeling of a good, heavy camera, compared to fully automatic digital pieces of plastic. There are a few people who just want to press the button and let the camera do the rest, but many prefer to have full control over what the camera is doing - something that's not even possible with most compact digital cameras (DSLRs are a different story though)

    It's not like I need to make anyone do something they don't want. When someone's happier shooting digital and not convinced by handling and results, that's no problem for me. Digital is not the devil, only another way. I can't do more than introduce them to the wonderful world of film.

  3. #73

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    New Hampshire
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverGlow View Post
    Why do you assume that a digital camera is always full auto, and cannot be used in manual mode?

    All the things you wrote that you can do manually with a film camera, one can also do with a DSLR, in full manual mode.

    I think this "I hate digital" mentality will do more to turn people off to film because is shows the worst side of us film shooters, as people that are irrational, threatened, and insecure with our choices in photography.

    I find it far more beneficial to sell film as another way to do photography, to express one's self visually. To damage the other medium in order to prop up my choice of medium will always come across subjective and irrational.

    When I'm asked why I shoot 35mm film instead of a DSLR, I give reasons that are:

    1. True
    2. NOT emotional.
    3. NOT religious.
    4. As another way to express myself visually.
    5. Devoid of attacking digital.

    And here they are:

    Film provides 1-2 stops wider dynamic range.
    Film shows lens diffractional issues less then digital.
    Film shows richer tonal graduations.

    There are of course other reasons to shoot film, but if you approach it from a pragmatic, true, and unemotional perspective people are much more likely to listen and give film a try.
    I was focusing on film because thats what the original poster was asking for. I learned how f stops and shutter speeds worked from digital, it gave me a huge head start versus film. I got very good as guessing exposures, and knew exactly how much motion blur a speed would give. I shot alot. But again, OP asked for film tips and I gave him what I knew.

    I'm going to disagree on avoiding emotional reasons for photographic analog. The connection I build with an image through taking it, developing it, discovering how to print it, and finally toning it... Its a good friend by the end. I know its in's and outs. Thats an emotional connection and I am far more attached to it.

    I do get attached to my digital stuff, but not as often.

    The emotional attachment is much more powerful than a couple stops of dynamic range. If I am going all out to expand my range with over exposing/ under developing and blah blah blah. 30 seconds of HDR gets the same thing.

    But when I talk about emotional attachment to others, I focus on the romanticism of wet photography. I really love it

  4. #74

    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Berlin Wi.
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    I'll just be glad to see real pictures.

    I mainly come into contact with digital camera users in my family. My neices kids all have those little digital cameras. A few months ago we were all together and I knew my great-neice had never seen my RB67. She was showing me her new Nikon P&S digital and I asked her if she ever saw my new camera. When I brought it out they were shocked at the size. I don't try to impress them with the benefits of film, I would be just be glad if they would actually make pictures that I can see. I show them my album of 4X6 shots and they show me a little 1 X 2 inch screen with a bunch of quick shots of silliness. I would guess 99% of them never get transfered to a hard drive or printer, so they will always be with them until they lose the camera. Rather than push film or digital, I tell them about keeping their pictures on archival CD's and properly storing them. Ofcourse that goes in one ear and out the other, but that tells me it wouldn't make much difference if they used film or digital, they are some day only going to have a few pictures. Ric.

  5. #75

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    Oct 2009
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    Central Florida, USA
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    My approach to film usage is that _I_ use film (B&W only) because I like what I see. It gives me the kind of image I'd like to make. Not that I can't make similar image using digital but film simply gives it to me. The result pleases me when I get it right. It expresses what I wanted to show. On the other hand, I use digital for color because, well, I like what I see.

    When I asked, I explain this just like I'm typing it in here. I have no intention on converting anyone. If that person is interested, then he/she has an option to try it. I even offer to process the film for them for free. My colleague was interested in it because it reminded him of old days, and his kids were intrigued because they have NEVER used film. I doubt they will become film user because it was just a curiosity thing for them.

    I see both media, film and digital, both having advantages and disadvantages. To me, trying to say which is superior and trying to convert someone because of it is an futile effort. Instead, I show them what I do and why I do it, and leave the choice entirely up to them.

    I see the original poster is a teacher. Isn't a job of teacher show students options, provide opportunities, and provide support when students make their own choice? If this is the case, then my approach would be to expose them to film, do few sessions two to run them through the process, maybe assign a job or two, and see what develops. (puns intended)

    I'd image his students are mostly young. Well, then, they can't possibly be interested or not interested in things they've never experienced. I'd be all for providing that first experience.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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