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Thread: Rule Of Thumb

  1. #21
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    Do others use this rule, or is it total bunk. If others do, how would you apply this to say, 6x7 Medium Format?

    Cheers
    I think the 1/FL rule works fairly well, but mostly in the long FL extreme. For wide lenses I feel that I can go much longer than 1/FL.

    For medium format, I would suggest thinking in terms of field of view. For 35mm, the FL=FOV in degrees, approximately. You get something like 50 degrees diagonal angle for a 50mm lens. But for MF and LF the FOV is much bigger, of course.

    A 50mm lens on 6x6cm square gives a field of view of ~80 degrees i.e. superwide. With a superwide on a medium format rangefinder I find that I get acceptable sharpness at ~1/8 sec, and even further with good bracing.

    In the end, it's all very individual. Technique matters for sure. How much you enlarge matters to, of course. But overall, I very seldom think of 1/FL when shooting- the timing of the scene usually decides my exposure. When I was doing sports and birds etc. with 35mm I thought of 1/FL more often.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  2. #22
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Don't forget the caffeine factor and other movement

    I notice that if I have too much coffee, my hands aren't as steady. When I hand hold a camera with slow shutter speeds, I take deep breath, exhale then gently squeeze the shutter. I carry a Gorillapod in my camera bag. It's such a versatile tripod, the tripod can be rested on or wrapped around. Along with a tripod, mirror lockup and a shutter release helps too.

  3. #23

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    I agree with Ralph always use a tripod or some other way to steady the camera whenever possible. Since some thumbs are steadier than others their rules sometimes don't work.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    When shooting with my Leica + 50mm lens I know that using 125th of a second I always get good sharp shots, there's no mirror to bounce.
    Even after Ralph's demonstration, you still believe that mirror bounce myth?

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Since the final print size is typically unknown, or could change in the future, it is common to make sure that camera shake is below the CoC. That's why I used it as a criterion in my posts.
    And rightly so.

    We must not forget that the rule is about when hand holding will begin to deteriorate image quality.
    And it does that completely independent of whatever else we may think of that can do that too.

    Using the CoC as a measure for the degree of degradation is fine, since you can't get 'better' than that. It doesn't imply that we need to look at those other things we can think of that could degrade image quality as well.

    The comparison is between, the rule about, hand holding. And nothing else.

  6. #26
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    When you break it down to the elements of shutter speed and focal length it holds well. Doubling the focal length requires 1/2 the shutter duration for the same amount of motion blur. (Since many people think of shutter speed as the denominator only, then it would be twice the speed)

    In terms of what is the minimum shutter speed you can hold, that is user dependent and easily checked.

  7. #27
    phaedrus's Avatar
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    Is it really dependent on focal length? The coc isn't. So I try to keep the shutter speed at 1/250 or less for critically sharp handheld punctures regardless of focal length.

  8. #28
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    Steve, I can handhold any of my cameras at a half second and consistently get images that look as sharp as those with the camera mounted on a tripod.











    If I stand far enough back when I look at them.

  9. #29

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    My father was a big SLR guy, owning a multitude of Canons and a rangefinder, he always used to say for daytime shots, "F/8 and go home"

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by phaedrus View Post
    critically sharp handheld punctures
    Ouch!

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