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  1. #11
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    ... Ralph,
    I am "seeing" the graph... would you translate that to me as to what I should be reading from the graph??
    The yellow filter 'converts' common B&W film to 'see' as humans do.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #12

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    Oooops. I was looking at the graph itself and didn't read the caption. sorry about that.....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    One should decide if what one sees is what one wants the print to look like. With conventional films I will sometimes use a yellow filter, but often prefer a lighter value in the sky -- usually just off paper white. So unless I feel the need for a dramatic sky, I shy away from filters. With TMax I rarely use a yellow filter as it seems to better balanced in its response to light to match the human eye.

    I tend to use filters more to contrast shapes of different colors.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #14
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    I seem to recall one of the pre-WWII folders -- the Voigtländer Bessa, I think -- came with a yellow filter on a hinged attachment so it was more or less permanently with the lens. You could swing it down out of the way if you didn't want it, but it was always right there. As far as sky and clouds are concerned, some B&W films seem to do a tiny bit better than others, probably some spectral sensitivity difference. (Or maybe I shot some on days with less atmospheric haze.)

  5. #15
    hoshisato's Avatar
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    One thing I found out when using a red filter on ADOX CHS 25 ART is that these older type of films are rather colour blind for red and it is worth having a look at the diagrams provided by the manufacturer if you are using some exotic film.
    http://monochrome.me.uk/blog/p/367
    http://monochrome.me.uk/blog/p/368

  6. #16
    hrst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    You are absolutely correct and have noticed what many photographers have noticed before. Within limits, your observations can be verified by photographic science (see attached).
    True with TMAX films (http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4016/f4016.pdf page 14, spectral sensitivity curves), but not with all films. For example, HP5+: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...1054152313.pdf (page 1), Delta 100: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/201062894918374.pdf (page 1). They have considerably lower blue response than green-yellow-red.

    Furthermore, there are different kind of yellow filters, regarding the cut-off wavelength and stop-band density. If you use a really yellow filter that filters out all of the blue, the result is very far from "what we humans see".

    So, yellow (or better: yellowish) filter converts a TMAX film to more like Ilfordish in the terms of color rendition.

  7. #17
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Thanks for the graph, Ralph. Good information.

    I'd like to see a similar graph with a Wratten #11 filter. I've always liked it as a "general-purpose" landscape pix filter. Seems to act like a light yellow filter, but seems to alter greens a tiny bit more.

    I generally tend to like how unfiltered b/w panchromatic film renders things a bit differently than what our eyes see, so filters are the exception for me. I sometimes like ortho films for landscapes too. To each his/her own.

    To the OP, I'd always use a yellow filter if you always want to achieve what Mr. Lambrecht's graph shows.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    True with TMAX films (http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4016/f4016.pdf page 14, spectral sensitivity curves), but not with all films. For example, HP5+: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...1054152313.pdf (page 1), Delta 100: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/201062894918374.pdf (page 1). They have considerably lower blue response than green-yellow-red...
    Not really, the charts aren't comparable. You see, Kodak's spectral sensitivity curves are made with exposure to daylight balanced light, whereas Ilford's are made with tungsten (2850°K) light. AFAIK, in order to make these charts, light passes through a prism and then exposes a piece of film. Different parts of the film are exposed by different wavelengths and they'll have different densities after development. Then the densities are read and you get the relative spectral sensitivity of the film at different wavelengths. Daylight has relatively uniform spectral power distribution throughout the spectrum, while tungsten light on the other hand is very different and has a lot of power in the longer wavelengths (towards red - IR). So, if the light you use delivers far more energy at the red end of the spectrum, it will definitely give a spectral sensitivity curve with a peak at the red end of the chart, while daylight would result in a curve with a peak at the violet - blue end.
    Last edited by Anon Ymous; 08-22-2010 at 07:14 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarification

  9. #19
    André E.C.'s Avatar
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    My yellow filters are always on my lenses, only removed when shooting indoors!

  10. #20
    andres's Avatar
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    For B&W I also always keep a light yellow or yellow/green filter on the lens.

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