Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,719   Posts: 1,514,849   Online: 890
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    112
    Images
    6

    Multiple Exposures?

    How much do you underexpose for multiple exposure? How many stops for each extra shot?

    I wanna take a bunch of multiple exposure stuff of the ocean, but i don't know how to expose for it.

    Thanks for your help, i'm leaving tommorow morning, so i'd like to know quick if possible.
    -tyler moore-

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    For each double exposure you reduce the indicated exposure by one stop.

  3. #3
    dlin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,627
    Images
    340
    Hi,

    I just tried this out recently, and it's fairly easy to calculate. As an example, if your metered reading suggests a 1/2 second exposure, you can build up the exposure by exposing 15 times at 1/30 sec (i.e. 15 x 1/30 = 1/2). You can use faster shutter speeds, but that will require many more exposures to build up to the final desired value. I don't believe there is any compensation to worry about until you get to much longer total exposure times.

    Hope that helps,

    Daniel

    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoTyler
    How much do you underexpose for multiple exposure? How many stops for each extra shot?

    I wanna take a bunch of multiple exposure stuff of the ocean, but i don't know how to expose for it.

    Thanks for your help, i'm leaving tommorow morning, so i'd like to know quick if possible.
    Last edited by dlin; 08-04-2004 at 11:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    112
    Images
    6
    oooh! okay, that makes sense! thank you a lot, and thanks more for a quick response.
    -tyler moore-

  5. #5
    Aggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    So. Utah
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,925
    Images
    6
    also some quick tricks for multi exposures. Anything against a light background has an etheral look, almost ghost like. Those against a dark background will stand out and be very sharp.

  6. #6
    Jim Moore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    885
    Images
    16
    I've said it before and I'll say it again.......

    This is what I love about APUG. You ask a question and usually within minutes you get helpful answers.

    Jim

  7. #7
    Les McLean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Northern England on the Scottish border
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,610
    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoTyler
    How much do you underexpose for multiple exposure? How many stops for each extra shot?

    I wanna take a bunch of multiple exposure stuff of the ocean, but i don't know how to expose for it.

    Thanks for your help, i'm leaving tommorow morning, so i'd like to know quick if possible.
    Take a meter reading as normal with the lens fully stopped down. Decide which shutter speed you want to use, clearly it must be a faster shutter speed than indicated by the meter reading. To arrive at the number of exposures needed using the faster shutter speed divide the slower speed into the faster speed. For example, the meter reading is 1/4 second at f22 but you wish to use 1/125th second at f22, divide 125 by 4, the answer is 31 multiple exposures at 1/125th. As a check that the multiple exposure is correct first make single exposure using the metered reading and then make your multiple exposure. When the film is developed the two adjacent negatives should be almost identical in density.

    I've used this method for nearly 30 years and found it very reliable. The image of Roughting Linn on the home page is a multiple exposure.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    112
    Images
    6
    Thank you guys! this will help a ton! you guys on here are the most helpful people on the interenet, especially in photogrpahy! Thanks!
    -tyler moore-

  9. #9
    tbm
    tbm is offline
    tbm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    365

    Multiple exposures

    An easy method is to double the film speed for the first shot and double it again for the second. For example, if you are using, say, Delta 100, your first shot would be taken with your camera set at a film speed of 200, then you would change the camera film speed to 400 and shoot the second one. For a third exposure you would double the 400 to 800.

    Several weeks ago I went out to shoot amongst a crowd of tourists with the intention of capturing some double and some triple exposures. I set the 180mm lens on my Leica R8 to f/4 and the metering to matrix. I pressed the button atop the R8 which prevents the film from advancing, thus allowing multiple exposures until it is released. The attached photo was obtained on Technical pan film. Since I was shooting Technical Pan at ISO 50 rather than 25, for the first exposure I doubled it to 100, for the second I doubled that to 200, and for the third I doubled that to 400. I had been laughing while watching people fiddling with the control buttons on their digital cameras, seeking help from others around them, observing many extending their fingers and arms all over the place, and banging into others as they went into a semi coma attempting to use their tiny digtal camera displays and viewfinders, missing many shots in the process amidst their confusion. I realized a triple exposure would successfully capture the confusion around me and that is what I accomplished. It is great fun seeking source material for double and triple exposures! You must remember,though, where the main point of interest was situated on the first shot in order not to wipe it out with a point of interest on the second shot. Like mastering all photographic skills, practice, practice, practice.
    Last edited by tbm; 08-21-2007 at 11:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
    roy
    roy is offline
    roy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Sussex
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,302
    One of the types of multiple exposure that interests me, is the effect created by UK photographer and teacher John Blakemore, who achieved a 'transparent' look where he was building up images rather in the form of layers. Looking at a still life for example, you would realise that there were other images underneath, not strikingly obvious at first glance. That, I would like to try but am not sure how to go about it. He also made some images in a 'windscape' series, where the foliage on trees took on the appearance of cotton wool and I assume that was by using the technique outlined by Les.
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin