Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,501   Posts: 1,571,673   Online: 1034
      
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Steve Mack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Dillwyn, Virginia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    142

    Question about a light yellow filter

    I bought a light yellow filter for B/W work, and the filter factor is 2x. I should know the answer to this, but I'm not sure, since I haven't used a filter in forever. Do I open one stop to compensate?

    Also, if I want to reset my light meter to be able to read values directly, where would I set the ISO on the dial for ISO 400 (Kodak Tri-X.)?

    Thank you to all who reply.

    With best regards,

    Stephen

  2. #2
    Ian David's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,079
    Images
    16
    Stephen -
    If the filter factor is 2x, you need to give your film an extra stop of exposure, eg open up one stop. Or set your light meter as if you are using ISO200 film. (It may help you to think in terms of slower film requiring extra exposure.)

    Ian

  3. #3
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,384
    A light yellow filter K1 is a half stop more exposure.
    A medium yellow filter K2 is a one stop more exposure as posed in post #2.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #4
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Regina Canada (sounds more fun than it is)
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    605
    Rule of thumb, one full stop like stated above. If using through-the-lens metering, let the camera do its' own compensation (set at 400 ISO and let camera compensate the stop). If using a spot meter, hold the filter in front of the spot meter to compensate as the light might be different depending on what is being metered.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin