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  1. #1
    Europan's Avatar
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    Stereoscopy wants synched shutters, doesn't she?

    Ahm, (slight shaking in the voice) Ladies and Gentlemen

    There is this professional portrait photographer, he has three shops in London, England, successful guy, who has built a camera for 3" by 3" images. I have seen a picture of his camera lately, you know everybody, the world wide web, and what I've actually discovered is, ehm, that he has the two shutters run not together, I mean, not synchronized in any way but something like da-dash shortly one after the other.

    Can anyone find an explanation for such an arrangement, I mean, how will you enjoy that kind of stereos?

  2. #2

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    Where can we see that picture of the camera on the world wide web?

  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Might offer some interesting photographs with a mobile subject unsynched like that.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  4. #4
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    It might be very interesting if the background remains static.

    I'm confused as to why your voice is shaking....
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #5
    Europan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    I'm confused as to why your voice is shaking....
    That was a sort of directing order, wanted to indicate how an actor could perform for an embarrassing issue.

    The photographer’s name is William Green or William Friese-Greene. The camera is from 1890. Patent together with Frederick Henry Varley

    http://books.google.ch/books?id=C1dg...varley&f=false

  6. #6
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    The link sent me to pages about a 3D cine-camera; but nonetheless interesting.

    I think to answer your question (or was it rhetorical?), yes, she wants synchronized shutters. I think the result with a moving subject would be kind of a disorienting double-vision; however, it might create kind of a ghost-impression that could be cool, assuming the camera itself remains static.

    I find it amusing that this "successful guy" you speak of happened to live a hundred years ago.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  7. #7
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    This guy? (quote from the www)
    William Friese-Green created the first 3-D anaglypic motion pictures in 1889 which first went on show to the public in 1893. These anaglypic films designated as plasticons or plastigrams enjoyed great success during the 1920's. The films used a single film with the green image emulsion on one side of the film and the red image emulsion on the other. In 1922, an interactive plasticon opened at the Rivoli Theater in New York titled "Movies of the Future". The film provided the viewer with an optional ending. The happy ending was viewed using the green filter whilst the tragic ending could be seen using the red filter.

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Well I've been looking at a British tailboard camera which can be used as a Stereo camera, this is what I'd use if I can find both either separately or together. I restore TP shutters



    No problem with synching two shutters and in production in the 1890's

    Ian

  9. #9
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Quote, "The films used a single film with the green image emulsion on one side of the film and the red image emulsion on the other."

    Wouldn't this result in a black image? I've been toying with this same idea; a "monopack anaglyph", that is, a subtractive system that only requires 1 projector.

    What am I missing here?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    No, you have two separate negatives side by side on a single plate (the camera has a baffle) like a stereo pair. It's how they are recombined that gives the stereo effect.

    The google link doesn't work so I can't check out this guys exact process (it's also late and I'm a few time zones ahead of the US ). Usually with B&W stereo the pair of images are converted to positives, lantern slides, and projected through two different colour filters and a set of coloured glasses used to see the 3D images, Green one eye Red the other. It's easy to look up.

    Ian

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