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  1. #41
    mobtown_4x5's Avatar
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    I'd also be interested in knowing if there is anything wrong with metering through the filter- I have been trying to be a little more presice in my exposures lately, and one of the things I did was pick up a second orange filter (I use all the time) to fit my spotmeter, so there is the same filter on the lens and meter (old analog Pentax 1 deg).

    Matt

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by mobtown_4x5
    I'd also be interested in knowing if there is anything wrong with metering through the filter- I have been trying to be a little more presice in my exposures lately, and one of the things I did was pick up a second orange filter (I use all the time) to fit my spotmeter, so there is the same filter on the lens and meter (old analog Pentax 1 deg).

    Matt
    I think that when one considers the matter of metering through the filter a couple of issues become involved.

    The first is that the meter may not have the same spectral response as the film being used and the second is that when one meters through the filter what one is basically determining is the response to light passage through the filter dependent on the color of the object being metered.

    In other words if one were to meter the northern sky at midmorning through a yellow 12 filter one would find that the effect on exposure would be far different then if one were metering through the same filter and metering a field of ripened wheat.

    The most accurate way of metering through a filter, in my opinion, is to meter an evenly illuminated 18% gray card.

    Having said that I would prefer to meter a card as indicated above then to accept the filter factor as ascribed by a filter manufacturer. Filter factors will vary dependent on the color of the object being photographed and the film being used.

    A more accurate way is to measure the filter as it affects the passage of light through the four channels of a color transmission densitometer. By doing this one can more accurately determine the filter factor as it applies to a given filter and a given generally colored object.

  3. #43
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Donald Miller
    The first is that the meter may not have the same spectral response as the film being used and the second is that when one meters through the filter what one is basically determining is the response to light passage through the filter dependent on the color of the object being metered.
    [/QUOTE]


    That is certainly true. It is equally as true whether or not metering though the filter in question.

    Fred Picker tried to address that problem, by modifying Honeywell Spot meters to respond more accurately to the spectral sensitivity of black and white film. A good idea in theory, but all black and white films do not have the same spectral response .. and metering for color would be adversely affected.

    Generally, the average well-known meter is ... dare I say it? ... "good enough" for most practical purposes.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #44
    david b's Avatar
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    In the current issue of LFI magazine (a leica magazine), they discuss why you should you a YELLOW filter with black and white film.
    They show comparisons of no filter, red filter, and the yellow filter.

    As for metering through the filter, I have a small filter on my pentax digital meter that matches what I have on the lens. So far, I've not had any issues.

  5. #45
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyH
    I advise buying the polarizer, yellow, and orange first in that order - as someone has already pointed out, you should probably standardize on the largest size you will need and buy appropriate step down rings for any lenses that take a smaller one. (of course this system fails when you standardize on, say 55mm and then buy a new lens that takes 62!)
    If you are doing landscapes, I would really consider making a split graduated (either hard or soft) filters at the top of the list. At a minimum get a 1 stop and a 2 stop filter (Cokin G1 and G2).
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #46
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Spiratone Colorburst Eight Point Star, Five Step Graduated Repeater.

    I _never_ take it off of my camera
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    Spiratone Colorburst Eight Point Star, Five Step Graduated Repeater.

    I _never_ take it off of my camera
    LOL

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    If you are doing landscapes, I would really consider making a split graduated (either hard or soft) filters at the top of the list. At a minimum get a 1 stop and a 2 stop filter (Cokin G1 and G2).
    Excellent advice roteague! I just discovered these a couple of years ago and have some 62s that work on everything from my super tak 200 down in 35mm size.

    I try to zone meter, even when my expansion or contraction of contrast range is limited to paper grades. Therefore I'm often metering very bright or dark areas of the subject "through" the filter and I've never really noticed a significant difference between the calculated filter factor for dark or light areas.

    As best I recall, CdS meter cells are more reflective of the spectrum sensitivity of normal panchromatic film. The smaller cells are also easier to cover with even my Rollei Series I filters..

  9. #49

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    Filters

    Hi,

    I am also new to this world of filters. ALthough I always have a UV filter on my camera at all times. Any advice on , which filters are best suited for Portraits and Glamour shots.

    Thanks,
    Sunny

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