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  1. #1

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    Minimum Shutter Speed for Wind?

    Anybody have any ideas for this? I know I can just trial and error, but it'd be nice to hear if anyone has any guidelines for this, say 20-30 km/h wind? What shutter speed would you use?

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Clearly you should shoot f/8 at 1/1000 sec at ISO 400.

    Just kidding.

    Please clarify. Do you mean, what shutter speed is required to prevent blur from wind? If so, that depends very much on how gusty the wind is, on the type of gear (bellows nor not), and how stable the camera/tripod coupling is.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Handheld I would keep the s/s at least double your focal length. If you can anchor your tripod and your coupler is snug and secure then I wouldn't worry about that too much. Unless the wind catches enough of your camera to ruin your day.
    Thank you.
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  4. #4
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I'll second Chris's advice to anchor the tripod. Last thing you want is to have the entire shot blurred because the camera moved.

    Then use a high shutter speed - or wait for a break in the wind - or enjoy the soft blur effect on trees and shrubs.

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    One of the shots I used in the current Blind Print Exchange was actually a near macro close-up - the 90mm lens on my RB67 was just about at it's closest focus.

    The shot is of a bowline hanging from a kayak stored on a rack.

    There was a gentle breeze when I shot it. Even though the camera was tripod mounted, I had to take three shots to get one sharp enough to use. This was due to the fact that the gentle breeze caused all sorts of problems with subject movement.

    I bring this up to point out that wind can cause all sorts of different problems, and as a result it is very difficult to give the OP a good answer to the question.
    Matt

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  6. #6

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    The minimum SS is also going to vary with the distance between camera & subject. The closer you are, the more noticeable it will be.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    The minimum SS is also going to vary with the distance between camera & subject. The closer you are, the more noticeable it will be.
    Read this as magnification as well. I recall as a kid, had a pocket magnifier shaped somewhat like a pen. I don't recall the exact magnification, but I was intrigued by the fact that looking at the minute hand on a watch with it, you could actually see it move.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

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  8. #8
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Using sports shooting as a guide I'd say you would want at least 1/500th, maybe even 1/1000th or higher to prevent blur. I usually like at least a little bit of motion blur to show that the picture wasn't taken on the moon.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  9. #9
    jp498's Avatar
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    Depends on the lens/equipment being used really, and how variable/turbulent the wind is.

    If composition allows, use your head/body to block the wind. I have shot out the radio room roof hatch in a b17 bomber which would be 170mph wind, and my body allowed me to get crisp photos from a normal sized 35mm camera with wide angle lens without the buffeting. If I was using a long lens, I probably would not have gotten sharp photos with the camera in the wind. I have shot from open cockpit planes with 105mm lens on 35mm bodies at 1/250th and up, and that's probably 75mph in the wind, and a little slower where I'd sit. On the ground though, wind is a lot more variable and turbulent and has it's own challenges.

    If you can use a tripod that will not only steady the camera, but it will allow you to block the wind with your body. (Stand upwind of the camera/tripod). A building is nice too. If timing isn't critical, you can be prepared and actually do the exposure between wind gusts, sort of like being in tune with your breathing when using handheld telephoto (or rifles).

  10. #10

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    Ah, sorry I didn't make it clear, I meant subject blur...
    I always use a tripod. But to get the depth of field I want on the grey days I am shooting, my meter often tells me to shoot at f/16, 1/30th, 400 ISO. Which I feel is limiting because I think there will be blur in the bushes, etc.

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