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  1. #11
    jp498's Avatar
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    Keep doing film as long as the local labs are making it easy for you. You are lucky to have local labs. Mailing it isn't a problem either as long as you're not in a rush.

    To make digital less time consuming, you really need a newer higher end computer. Most general purpose machines aren't fit for it; they need an upgrade of some sort, usually ram and display. The software needed to efficiently process and batch adjust images is not fast or lightweight. That's where you put a price on your time. Do I spend $1000 on a new PC or do I suffer with my current slow one for another year or spend $500 on a false sense or economy for a more reliable low end one, and how much time will this decision save me. Then you have to duplicate all your data every 5 years (not that difficult with big hard drives) so you don't lose it to the ravages of time and entropy. Use digital where it's convenient; don't fight it when you don't want to use it or it's not the right tool. I've been doing digital color for 10 years, so I kinda got it figured out, not much challenge anymore, and find the newer dslr cameras to beat 35mm color film in terms of detail, but choice of medium is your artistic decision, not mine. Personally I like analog for B&W.

    I don't do color printing, but I have done it in the past. It is indeed easy if things are consistent like Mike Wilde aims for. It's tough when you pick a random negative out of your binder from some outdoor scene and try to make a perfect print quickly.

  2. #12

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    there is a link/banner/block ad that pops up here on apug
    for this place

    http://www.photomfa.com/

    they have listings for labs and might be of help to you ...
    there is also the acecam list ..

    good luck !
    john
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  3. #13
    bo eder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    Keep doing film as long as the local labs are making it easy for you. You are lucky to have local labs. Mailing it isn't a problem either as long as you're not in a rush.

    To make digital less time consuming, you really need a newer higher end computer. Most general purpose machines aren't fit for it; they need an upgrade of some sort, usually ram and display. The software needed to efficiently process and batch adjust images is not fast or lightweight. That's where you put a price on your time. Do I spend $1000 on a new PC or do I suffer with my current slow one for another year or spend $500 on a false sense or economy for a more reliable low end one, and how much time will this decision save me. Then you have to duplicate all your data every 5 years (not that difficult with big hard drives) so you don't lose it to the ravages of time and entropy. Use digital where it's convenient; don't fight it when you don't want to use it or it's not the right tool. I've been doing digital color for 10 years, so I kinda got it figured out, not much challenge anymore, and find the newer dslr cameras to beat 35mm color film in terms of detail, but choice of medium is your artistic decision, not mine. Personally I like analog for B&W.

    I don't do color printing, but I have done it in the past. It is indeed easy if things are consistent like Mike Wilde aims for. It's tough when you pick a random negative out of your binder from some outdoor scene and try to make a perfect print quickly.
    I get your point. I've been doing digital for about 10 years now too on a nice big PowerMac with enough power and a 30" monitor, and even I have to continually worry about upgrading and spend time with it. Having digital cameras is like having a car that needs to be maintained and upgraded much quicker. I think my whole point is trying to stop using digital in the first place. I really just need a simple quick way to get it into the computer for the odd-titling or headshots. Other than that, using film all the time would be great.

    This dilemma is hard because everybody trying to make a living in photography is doing it, and clients don't always understand what they're into and the impatience sets in more often now. I blame Random Access! I've heard it said more than once: digital was the greatest thing to ever happen to photography, and the worst.
    While I try to balance out this equation for myself, I'll continue on with that sorta' trusty EOS-1D (yeah, the 4MP one - it does great BTW).

  4. #14

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    If you have a place that is doing a good job of printing and packing your prints for you then stick with them as long as you can. As for processing, again stick with your Sam's as long as you can, as long as you are feeding that machine it might just survive.

    Your local Sam's club may stop processing film in house at some point, but they may continue to print from digital so keep using them for that service, they know you, and they know what you want and will continue to deliver it for you as long as they can. If your local Sam's stops processing film in house they probably will not care where the photos on your memory stick came from when you show up for print service. The people working at Sam's probably like working in the photography area, and will be happy with whatever work you can bring them.

    As for processing, if your local Sam's stops doing it in house TEST their send out service and see how well they do, it might not be all that bad to use there send out service. Before that happens you might want to shop a few places and see how they do on test rolls just so you have a backup plan in place if you need it. The places that come to mind and do a really good job for me believe it or not are CVS, Rite-Aid, and Walgreen's if you want to stay local, I find that negative quality has more to do with the person running and taking care of the machine than anything else. I'm not a big fan of send out services, while they do excellent work for the most part, I prefer places that I can walk into and people that I know and know me. I have my film processed by Marry Ann, Rene, Janette, Mia, Michelle, and while Randy is too far of a drive for processing, I buy chemicals from him still. All these people work in real shops that I enjoy visiting and processing is not there first business, but they all do it quite well for me.

    As for the whole line about there will always be people to process film, that is true but you have to be sure you do whatever you can to support them so that they can stay in business and be there processing film for you and everyone else that needs it. Also remember Digital was going to kill film, Film was going to kill painting, Painting was going to ruin drawing, and I am a draftsman so we see how all that is really going.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  5. #15
    bo eder's Avatar
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    Again, thanks all for the replies so far. So I've lurked around since the last post and I discover (obviously) that alot of you do your own developing and printing.

    Question: is it crazy to think I can jump back into film without, at some point, considering developing myself?

    Part of me has this romantic notion of going back to the old ways and just shooting b&w and maybe carving a niche in providing b&w portraiture (who hasn't done that, right?). If I was brave enough to do that, I'd develop my own negs in a heartbeat. But then I feel like I should just go all the way and build a dark room to do some printing...

    And then reality hits that with a full time job, what little photography I do has to exist around everything else that needs me. I couldn't tell you if I'd love taking the time to develop film, let alone spend time printing. Maybe I'm not a film guy after all? Anyone ever dealt with that feeling? I mean, the rest of my life is so ensconced in digital - except for my completely analog Omega Speedmaster Moon watch - everything I do revolves around this internet, DVR's, Blu-Rays, camcorders....even the music I make and listen to is very digital. I play real drums though, but the recording and marketing is all digital. It wouldn't be possible to get it out there if it weren't for digital.

    Someone here called themselves an anachronism. Could I be experiencing false-anchrony?

  6. #16
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bo eder View Post
    Question: is it crazy to think I can jump back into film without, at some point, considering developing myself?
    I don't think it's crazy. For the two weddings I have done I sent my film to a lab who process the film and then give you proof prints. These are digitally produced on Fuji Crystal Archive paper rather than optically printed as is probably the case almost everywhere now.

    The lab will keep the files for a year and you can order re-prints just by quoting the image number on the back of the print. To me that's much easier than the current digital method.

    EDIT: I just noticed the drum kit in your avatar image. Who do you play with? There is a link to one of my bands at the bottom of this post.

    Quote Originally Posted by bo eder View Post
    I play real drums though, but the recording and marketing is all digital.
    Most recording is digital now but to counter that, many musicians/studios use valve (tube) equipment such as microphone preamplifiers. See another link below! I have also made an all valve mixing desk for a friend who is a drummer. He does session work at Toerag Studios in London which is very much all analog and vintage and does very well with it.

    Here is their steam powered website: http://www.toeragstudios.com/

    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 12-02-2010 at 05:09 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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