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  1. #1

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    Proper Flash Exposure Same Procedure as With DSLR's

    I have come back to MF film and still using Canon 5D MK2 . Back in the day I set my flash on F8 and camera on F8 and was good. Now I am questioning if I use my Digital camera next to my MF camera and set ISO and then shoot with flash on both will the film camera exposure be correct? using the same exposure as my DSLR
    setting with my histogram??? I was going to use my flashmeter for my exposure and then set my MF film camera to the settings on my meter. Any suggestions?
    thanks, rollsman

  2. #2
    hpulley's Avatar
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    First, which MF camera are you using? Is it manual exposure or does it have TTL flash? I doubt you can use your DSLR as a "flash meter" in this case unless you have a very advanced MF camera with TTL flash.

    Mine is mechanical with just flash sync so I have to set it myself. My flash has a dial I can turn to set the ISO and range and get the aperture, it syncs at any speed. Or you can use the guide number formula:
    GN = distance × f-number
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  3. #3

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    I have the Bronica GS-1. I have the AE Prism finder. I was going to put my Digital SLR next to my MF and see the settings from the digital camera and apply them to my manaul MF camera. Will the exposure bee close or other suggestions? thanks, rollsman

  4. #4
    wiltw's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that digital cameras' ISO sensitivity has not always met the same criteria! For example, early Canon dSLRs had ISO 100 sensitivity which was deemed closer to ISO 125 by testers. Later, Canon made newer models have truer ISO sensitivity, so rated ISO 100 behaved closer to ISO 100 expectations.

    At the same time, even film ISO's were a bit variable. For example, Velvia was frequently rated ISO 40 by users, though the box stated ISO 50.

    So in comparing one with the other, how true are they both?!

    Generally I find that digital ISOs generally are like using film ISOs typically, in terms of needing (or not needing) to tweak ISO values set in the meter vs. accuracy of apertures and shutter speeds (both of which add their own variants!)

  5. #5
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Should be very close if all all settings are the same.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #6
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I recommend using a flash meter. I do not yet, I use YN-460 II's with my RB67 and wireless triggers, use my Canon 30D for flash metering, would love a flash meter, would make life easier.

  7. #7
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    I recommend using a flash meter. I do not yet, I use YN-460 II's with my RB67 and wireless triggers, use my Canon 30D for flash metering, would love a flash meter, would make life easier.
    I agree with Athiril, flash meters are really nice. I use a Sekonic L358 with off camera strobes in manual mode.

    On camera strobes in TTL or A mode do there own metering or depend on the camera in real time. Flash meters don't provide any advantage in these situations.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #8
    jp498's Avatar
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    I'm not sure about the canon flashes, but the Nikon ones have an option to go off TTL and onto regular old fashioned autoexposure with the built in sensor on the flash like an old vivitar 285hv or something. This is great for bounce or modified flash. Then there's another option on the flash for full manual where you set the iso, aperture, and it indicates a distance that the power setting is suitable for. Adjust power setting or aperture for different distances. I think you'll find B&W film to be more forgiving than digital in terms of exposure; a little overexposed is easily tamed in B&W, but often not worth keeping in digital. I have a minolta flashmeter IV which is now $100+ish used and it does a great job for flash, flash+ambient, or ambient exposure. And you'll really look like a pro wearing it around your neck.



 

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