Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,202   Posts: 1,531,561   Online: 1099
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,643
    Images
    5
    Good Evening, Janet,

    Contact me with a PM and supply a postal address; I'll be glad to send you an E-6 transparency which was shot using the double-exposure approach. Sorry I don't have a scanner which will work well with transparencies.

    Konical

  2. #22
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    It is not clear here what you mean for "night photography". Do you take pictures of buildings, squares, statues etc. by night? Do you want to take images in moonlight? Do you want to render that it is night? (If you don't include the sky in your picture, you can take picture at night and it wouldn't show that it is night).

    This link has a table, down the page, with typical EV for night photography:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposure_value

    I find EV 3 is a good starting point for something that is lit as a monument. More normal street illumination over buildings is probably around EV 2. Spot lights on statues etc. can arrive to EV 5. If you use B&W negative, for general street night scenes I think that EV 2 should give you something printable anyway.

    I do this kind of stuff with slide film and use a spot reflected light metre. I basically never feel the need to bracket. I point the spotmeter on the highlights that I intend to properly render as a texture at 2,3 EV "above" the grey point that the spot meter gives me for that spot, and that is all. With negative B&W you can even do, as said, without light metre as you have a certain error margin.

    As already observed, you can't mix in your picture zones with only star or moon illumination and zones with artificial light. If you intend to take landscape pictures under star light or moonlight, you should try to exclude artificially lighted places from your composition.

    If you just enjoy going around downtown taking pictures at night (as I do, but in summer) you will find that exposure values are pretty much similar, most of the time you are in the EV 2 - EV 5 range. Probably very brightly lit monuments can arrive to EV 6.

    Fabrizio
    Last edited by Diapositivo; 01-30-2011 at 07:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Oz
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    481
    Shooting at night?

    Check out this link!!!

    http://gizmodo.com/5742383/175-photo...taken-at-night

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin