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  1. #11
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Does anyone bother/attempt to use the zero correction? I've never messed with it, but I'm curious about it.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Does anyone bother/attempt to use the zero correction? I've never messed with it, but I'm curious about it.
    Yes, I've recalibrated a few meters over the years, they can drift a bit. I rebuilt a damaged Gossen meter last year and calibrated it against my Spotmeter, later I checked it against my other Gossen and it was spot on.

    Ian

  3. #13

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    I still have a Weston Master V which I purchased in 1968 or 1969. It worked well when new, but the silicon cell gave out and it would, as others have noted here, only read weakly. I sent it to these people: Link and it has worked exceedingl well since. I have compared it to two digital meters, on a new Sekonic, and it agrees with them. In practice, it gives excellent results.

    I have a Zeiss Ikophot that is not so lucky.
    Geo.

  4. #14
    jmcd's Avatar
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    I have a II, two IV models, and a V. They are dead accurate, and match each other at low, middle, and high light levels. Thanks go to Quality Light Metric, where cells were replaced, and meters calibrated.

    I have an old IKOPHOT and it just needed calibration. It's cell is still good. I don't know how old it is, but I am guessing it is original.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Does anyone bother/attempt to use the zero correction? I've never messed with it, but I'm curious about it.
    To zero correct a Western meter cover the meter cell with something opaque with the dial facing you and with it held horizontally tilt it away from you at a 45 degree angle insert a small screwdriver in the adjustment screw at the rear of the meter then just turn the screw until the needle is on zero.
    Ben

  6. #16

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    To calibrate a Weston meter, first zero correct it as described by Benjiboy. Then, on a bright cloudless day between 10 am and 2 pm, point it up at the clear blue sky in the opposite direction of the sun -- ie[the southern sky if you're in the southern hemisphere, north if you're in the north -- and take a reading. The needle should be at about 13.5, corrresponding to an exposure value of around 14 to 15.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LouisG View Post
    To calibrate a Weston meter, first zero correct it as described by Benjiboy. Then, on a bright cloudless day between 10 am and 2 pm, point it up at the clear blue sky in the opposite direction of the sun -- ie[the southern sky if you're in the southern hemisphere, north if you're in the north -- and take a reading. The needle should be at about 13.5, corrresponding to an exposure value of around 14 to 15.
    Is there another method Louis, we don't get many "bright cloudless days" here in Britain, even when the Romans invaded us in 54 BC , they used to write home the weather here was crap
    Ben

  8. #18
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pgeobc View Post
    I still have a Weston Master V which I purchased in 1968 or 1969. It worked well when new, but the silicon cell gave out and it would, as others have noted here, only read weakly. I sent it to these people: Link and it has worked exceedingl well since. I have compared it to two digital meters, on a new Sekonic, and it agrees with them. In practice, it gives excellent results.

    I have a Zeiss Ikophot that is not so lucky.
    The Western Master V has a Selenium cell, light meters with Silicon cells need a battery to power them.
    Ben

  9. #19
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    I seem to attract old Westons. I have a Master that works, 3 Master IIs that work and 1 that doesn't, 1 Master III that works and 1 that doesn't, 1 Master 4 that works and 1 that doesn't, 3 Master Vs that don't, a EuroMaster that doesn't and a Euromaster II that does, and best of all, 2 Ranger 9 spotmeters that have been gone over by Quality Light Metric and recalibrated for non mercury batteries.

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