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  1. #1

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    B&W without filters

    Hi

    I am a B&W shooter, almost exclusively FP4+ which I soup in D-76 stock as per manufacturer's instructions. My main SLR is an OM which gets me by very nicely. I usually use a medium yellow (K2) filter for all my photos to get the contrast good. However, I also have a Minox 35 GSE which I want to use for B&W. Minox never made any colour filters for this camera, none are available bar the UV filter they made. My question is this: seeing as I won't be able to get a coloured B&W contrast filter on the Minox, what is there to be done about contrast? I usually scan my negs before printing (heresy I know) and a set of photos taken without the yellow filter looked distinctively worse than the ones with filter (lower contrast, more haze etc). Is the effect being exaggerated by scanning (never printed pics that had no filter) and if not can it be corrected for when printing using higher contrast grades? (for the record I'm using a colour enlarger) There must surely be a way of making them look good without filter, since plenty of people use Minoxes for B&W.

    Thanks in advance

    Alex
    Last edited by Alex1994; 03-03-2011 at 12:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Filters on b/w film do not act directly on contrast. The change the way in which color relationships are rendered tonally.

    If you have the filter ring diameter, you can look around for tiny filters. Here is a link to KEH's small filters: http://www.keh.com/Camera/format-Acc...c=79033&r=WG&f.

    I would consider looking into one of the smaller Kodak Series filter systems if you cannot seem to find screw ins.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  3. #3

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    Thanks for calling in. Yeah, I was aware of how the filters worked. The Minox is a mess to get filters on, there is no filter thread, you can get one if you buy the Minox UV filter, in which case you want a 32mm thread. I had trouble finding a 49mm for the Olympus here in the UK so 32mm I imagine will be nigh on impossible...

    I would rather avoid a bulky filter system like the Kodak. The Minox is all about compactness and discreetness.

  4. #4
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1994 View Post
    Yeah, I was aware of how the filters worked.

    I would rather avoid a bulky filter system like the Kodak. The Minox is all about compactness and discreetness.
    In your OP, you displayed many times that you are not aware:

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1994 View Post
    I usually use a medium yellow (K2) filter for all my photos to get the contrast good.

    My question is this: seeing as I won't be able to get a coloured B&W contrast filter on the Minox, what is there to be done about contrast?

    ...a set of photos taken without the yellow filter looked distinctively worse than the ones with filter (lower contrast, more haze etc).
    Colored b/w filters do not affect overall contrast. They affect how specific colors are rendered as tonal values.

    Kodak series filter systems are nowhere near "bulky." They consist of two interlocking rings and a filter that is sandwiched between them.

    I don't know. You can figure something out if you really want that yellow filter. Cut a gel filter down and place it over the UV filter, for example.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 03-03-2011 at 11:46 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #5

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    Kodak Series V or Series VI

    Try looking for a Kodak Series V (sometimes Series 5) filter adapter. These adapters were made a long time ago and don't require threads on the front of the lens. They are designed to slide over the outside of a lens without threads. Simply measure the outside diameter of the lens and get an adapter of the corresponding size. Then you can use any Series filter with this adapter.
    Dave

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  6. #6

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    Why not hand-hold a yellow filter from your Olympus kit in front of the Minox lens? This is not uncommon. I've done this with an Olympus XA with great success.

  7. #7
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    I did something similar with my XA only I used my clip-on, sunglass lens (orange tint) for some shots of cloud formations over the lake we stay at most summers. Worked just fine.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    In your OP, you displayed many times that you are not aware:

    Colored b/w filters do not affect overall contrast. They affect how specific colors are rendered as tonal values.
    You seem to be quite a stickler for verbal pedantry 2F/2F.

    Do you assume that because someone doesn't recite the textbook phrase to describe a photographic phenomenon that they are just hopeless idiots who have no understanding of photography?

    If you're imagining a blue sky and it's relationship to a grassy lawn; there is contrast between them. That is, there is a degree of difference; small or large. Adding a dark red filter will darken the tonal rendering of the blue sky, and thus the contrast between the sky and grass will change. Surely you can see how this affects contrast.

    Ok... looking forward to your rebuttal.

    edit: actually, after rereading the OP I kind of see what you're saying. nevermind!
    Last edited by holmburgers; 03-03-2011 at 01:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  9. #9

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    Alex I use classic cameras for all of my work, folders,tlr's etc, and it can bee very hard to get filters for all of them, so I have filters for some, and those that I cannot get the right size filters for I simply fit slightly oversize filters over the lens with blu tac, maybe it doesn't look that smart but it works, just make sure that you use a slightly over size filter to avoid vigniting, I also have a yellow cokin filter cut down to fit some lenses again with blu tac,Richard

  10. #10

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    Perhaps the solution is a push-on filter.
    Steve.

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