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  1. #21

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    So, it's really personal taste, I guess. For example, Andre, your "Man With Hammer" and "Cleaning a Fish" aren't my cup of tea, but others may really like them. There's a certain soft luminosity that appeals to me, so that's what I look for. That's why I'll never be a pro: I like to shoot what I like to shoot, and I don't like to be told what to shoot. I was doing some portrait work, mostly for friends and family, but have given that up. I don't like to hear "OK, now here's what I want." Rocks and trees don't talk back, and for a guy with a teenager in the house, I need that. :rolleyes:

    Also, it's not really true that I've never shot a midday without good results. I've got some fill flash shots, where the ambient light is underexposed by 2 or 3 stops, that I like. But that's not a natural light shot.

    This thread is really a great argument for analog photography, especially with older gear. If I'm out in the woods on a wet, sloppy day, and I dropped my Minolta Autocord, I'd hate it. But I would shrug, say "Oh well", and go get another one for $100.00. Can't say that about a D1 rig!
    "If You Push Something Hard Enough, It Will fall over" - Fudd's First Law of Opposition

  2. #22
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesco
    Nearly 70% of all my outdoor photos were taken between 1 pm and 4pm. It is really not that time of day that is important to me more the way the light falls - sometimes diffused is best for the subject at hand and sometimes direct, harsh sunlight works better. A great scene can be rendered lifeless by the wrong "fall" of light.
    It also makes a difference where you live. Up north where you live the light fades much slower in the evening, then down closer to the equator where I live. Here I find that the light is practially useless until after 4pm (in summer), then you have to work quickly, since the sun sets much quicker.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #23

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    You are spot on Robert. In the summer the light lasts longer and falls slower in the evenings. Nevertheless, the winters are even more special. You only have maximum two or three hours to really get anything done but the effort is worth it. Truly the time of "glowing" light.
    Francesco

  4. #24
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesco
    Nevertheless, the winters are even more special. You only have maximum two or three hours to really get anything done but the effort is worth it. Truly the time of "glowing" light.
    Reminds me of when I visted the UK a few years ago. I walked around Portholme Meadow in Huntingdon and just reveled in the soft quality of the late afternoon sunlight. Unfortunately, I haven't gotten as far north as you yet - who knows though. However, next year I am going back to New Zealand if I have to take a rowboat .
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #25
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I definitely have my preference for how I like the light to look. But, there are all sorts of ways to make the light look like that. Of course, I don't shoot landscapes.

    I don't think there's anything wrong with having a strong preference for one type of light. Personally, I usually prefer soft, very directional light. That said, for the work I do, I have to be prepared to handle flat light, backlight, midday light, weak light, etc. My equipment consists of a camera, lens, and light meter. On very rare occasions I'll use a reflector or a tripod. Almost never. But of course, I do have the luxury of being able to relocate my subjects, at least to some extent.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Bennett
    That's why I'll never be a pro: I like to shoot what I like to shoot, and I don't like to be told what to shoot.
    Same here....

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Bennett
    This thread is really a great argument for analog photography, especially with older gear. If I'm out in the woods on a wet, sloppy day, and I dropped my Minolta Autocord, I'd hate it. But I would shrug, say "Oh well", and go get another one for $100.00. Can't say that about a D1 rig!
    Same here as well....

  7. #27

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    Thanks for your input ... all of you, Doug - I have read some of your previous post and think I understand what you are looking for. Here in N. Texas there are times in the late afternoon/evening starting around this time of year (end of Aug) that the light becomes special - I have also seen this light in parts of the Western states..it is hard for me to describe to anyone that has not seen it..kind of like trying to explain how the sky out West is Bigger..you almost have to see it for yourself.

    Now, my travels have been limited to the US for the most part and while light is light, there are times when it is special. Thomas/David - I think you have given me enough reason to pick a local scene I like, and work with it with detailed notes on exposure, time of day, light conditions etc. Now, seems like it would be a good practice anyhow - my field notes are pretty bad (when I do them).

    Cheryl, your comments are interesting as well...
    Mike C

    Rambles

  8. #28
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    It's Rarely About the Light

    Light is simply a part of CONTENT. Experience helps you be aware of the light, to plan or manipulate light, but when the subject becomes light itself, or is overwhelmed by lighting choices, then you're in real danger of being constrained by an overly-narrow set of mannerisms, of erasing genuine content in the interest of preconceived aesthetics.

    IMO (of course) the great beauty of photography is in its ability to quickly record exhaustive detail. Lighting becomes part of that. In a photograph, EVERYTHING has the potential for meaning -- no part of the frame is neutral. So light, as part of what will be captured, cannot be entirely ignored. But too often it is used as a glossy polish on old shoes.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  9. #29

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    There is nothing more satisfying that finding something ordinary with the right light that makes it radiate, shine, glow, etc.. Right place at the right time is all well and good but being quick to unfold the 8x10 and set up the shot is just as important. Gotta be quick!
    Francesco

  10. #30

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    I think that a great deal depends on what one is photographing. Certainly I would not typically attempt portraiture in harsh midday lighting. Nor would I attempt to photograph abstractions based in line, form, light and shadow in the soft early or late light.

    It was interesting to me that as I viewed Michael Smith's and Paula Chamlee's images, several months ago, how many worked because they were exposed in very high contrast lighting.

    Let's face it, in most cases, high contrast lighting conditions not only affect overall contrast but local contrast as well. Local contrast gives the glow to a photograph.

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