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  1. #41
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    John, that second one works just fine for me.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    Light is to photography as sound waves are to music - signals which make possible the apprehension of the artist's finished product. You don't need high contrast lighting to make beautiful photographs any more than you need loud sounds to make beautiful music. Photography is about the space.
    Flawed anology. High contrast light would compare to high dynamic music (i.e. loud notes combined with soft notes) not simply loud music. In music, mixed dynamics are generally more interesting than music played all at one dynamic level.

    The real comparison with music & photography is with well controlled dynamics. Letting musical notes get too loud (distorted or blaring) or too soft to be heard is bd just as letting highlights blow out or shadows go detail-less. Controlling the "in betweens" is where the artists show up.

  3. #43
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    The best advice on landscape photography that I was ever given was "photograph the light, not the landscape" I have followed it for 25 years and it has rarely let me down.

    There has been some excellent advice and opinions posted but no one has said anything about darkroom technique to help create the impression of light. Any thoughts.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
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    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    There has been some excellent advice and opinions posted but no one has said anything about darkroom technique to help create the impression of light. Any thoughts.
    Impression of light using darkroom techniques = achieving beautiful local contrast in my opinion. The only technique I use to TRY and achieve better local/micro contrast is using minimal agitation on tube development. Ever since I made the switch to minimal agitation from continuous agitation I have had much success with rendering the feeling of light in my negatives. Not to mention increased apparent sharpness. A second technique is to vary development time consistently over a broad range of SBRs, thus controlling the range of light within acceptable levels.
    Francesco

  5. #45

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    This one takes some thinking. My first response is that I always print for the light also. That really does not say much. As far as processing, I aggitate for highlights and mid tones independantly and leave some non aggitation time to put some detail in the blacks, but only once during to process.
    When it comes time to print: In a controlled environment the lighting scheme dictates printing. I have 3 lighting schemes, with one of these schemes the images can be printed to emulate grey light and the 2nd high keylight.
    Within the environment it really depends on the light recorded and how I saw it while exposing film. Sometimes there is a plan for the final print and some times not. When there is no plan I usually make 2 proof prints 1 at the right exposure and 1 printed down 40 to 50%. The darker one I'll put on the light box and view it with transmitted light, hoping to find an image that works well with saturated values.
    These are some quick thoughts maybe some more detailed comments will come during the day and I'll put those up later.

  6. #46

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    Les said:
    There has been some excellent advice and opinions posted but no one has said anything about darkroom technique to help create the impression of light. Any thoughts.
    First of all, let me again apologize for my crummy scanning technique.

    In a straight print of this scene, the area from which the water is falling, and the area underneath the fall, would both be jet black. Some careful dodging reveals a nice luminence above, and just a hint of detail below. IMHO, it makes the print.

    In a recent shot of some gladiolas after a rain storm, the overall scene is nicely, but evenly, lit. I picked one flower in the center, dodged it, then worked outward with more dodging, creating a sort of luminous center.

    In this shot, the light was again very nice but kind of flat. Some dodging of the leaves at left center, and of the area to the right of the tree trunk, worked well.

    When out in the field shooting, I always try to walk around and carefully "see" the light. I recently shot an old storefront in south Alabama. I set up my tripod, was ready to shoot, but decided to walk around some. About 6 feet to one side, the windows of the building suddenly lit up with reflections of clouds in the sky. Again, some careful dodging of the windows made them stand out, and again I think it made the print.
    "If You Push Something Hard Enough, It Will fall over" - Fudd's First Law of Opposition

  7. #47

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    BTW: if anyone is still making their own dodging tools (as I was until recently), let me highly recommend the Testrite Dodging Kit, costing all of about $8.00 USD. It comes with 6 or 8 plastic shapes and a nice handle. Much mo betta.
    "If You Push Something Hard Enough, It Will fall over" - Fudd's First Law of Opposition

  8. #48

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    Darkroom techniques: 1) split-filtering combined with dodging/burning for each filter (#0 & #5) setting ( as per Les McLean's book); 2) masks for windows, etc. that need heavy burning in to get detail; 3) graded paper to raise contrast/light areas; 4) minimal agitation for print (Juan's suggestion) to lower contrast for graded paper; 5) split-dev or 2 bath development to control tonal range. Some techniques that I've tried as I continue to learn from others.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  9. #49

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    The dark room is a wonderful place to make a bit of unreality. I like creating shadows using masks and extra burning. Selective dodging puts hihglights where they were not. Old cardboard photo paper boxes work great and they can be manipulated and frayedin a way to make some seriously convincing shadows. Who needs PS when you have a darkroom, scissors, wire, tape and cardboard
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    ...There has been some excellent advice and opinions posted but no one has said anything about darkroom technique to help create the impression of light. Any thoughts.
    Yes we've neglected this a bit. Francesco mentions 'Local Contrast' in the print. I think the local contrast can definately give the print what is sometimes termed a 'Glow'. Getting the density and contrast factors working together properly can really make an image sing. It can gain a luminosity and three dimensional depth that a print with 'flatter' local contrast just doesn't have.
    I've found this to be rather ellusive sometimes (and end up blaming the cat or the negative). It requires a great deal of assessment/judgement to be applied during printing, with incremental fine tuning to get it there. Also certainly, some degree of knowledge of the materials and tools is required.
    A formal method of achieving a glowing print, I don't have. Hwoever I can mention, that you need to know what it looks like, and have to consciously aim to achieve it. (and it involves 'local contrast'). Hope this helps a little. regards, John.
    Last edited by John McCallum; 09-21-2004 at 06:20 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Grammar

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