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  1. #1
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Cool little tricks

    I'm sure we all have them.

    Here's one to start.

    I've started taking a picture of my incident meter just before or just after a set of shots in one lighting situation.

    This "meter shot" can give me a great way to remember what I did and a nice reference shot to set my enlarger to.

    Mine is a Seconic L-358. It is gray (like a grey card I can peg mid-tones), has a white dome (white point) with a black ring around it (a black point) that can be used to check contrast and exposure.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #2
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    And a second.

    In my changing bag/tent I put a coffee mug in it when loading film on reels.

    It's my trash can for spools, cans, cuttings...

    Keeps my bag clean and it's easier to find the next roll when I'm not digging through the leftovers of the previous three rolls.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #3
    nhemann's Avatar
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    I leave the tails of my leaders out when I unload my film (and fold them over so I know whats shot) - It lets me thread the first inch of the spool in the daylight before I load it all into the dark bag. No more fumbling in the dark trying to spool up. A simple snip at the end of the roll and I'm done.

    I also made a little 1/2 -inch PVC frame for my bag to create a poor man's tent and give me some working room.
    "There is no such thing as objective reality in a photograph"

    My flickr and (gasp!) dpug photos - take a look if you like.

  4. #4
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    I would probably forget to leave the coffee out all together. That would be a mess.
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  5. #5
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhemann View Post
    I leave the tails of my leaders out when I unload my film ...
    I left my leader out once while out exposing and almost got busted...
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #6
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall View Post
    I would probably forget to leave the coffee out all together. That would be a mess.
    Depends on the time of day I guess.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #7
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Picturing what the meter tells you has merit, though for decades I've recorded all such information in notebooks. Most Sekonics remember the last metering session (e.g. the L758/D) until cleared — especially useful for involved multi-spot readings.

    My pet trick is to use small patches of Velcro attached to cable remotes cords etc to stop them dangling around in windy conditions to to hold in place when changing over cameras.

    If leaving leaders out of film spools, make absoutely sure after exposing the roll to mark that leader top and bottom, visible day and night. Maybe even slap an adhesive label on and record the roll/sequence number if not reloading it.


  8. #8
    jp498's Avatar
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    If I use a different film, I cut out a little rectangle of the box and fit the piece of the box with the film information into the camera's flash shoe (which I don't use). Kinda handy for the 120 cameras that don't have a window like the 35mm cameras.

  9. #9
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall View Post
    I would probably forget to leave the coffee out all together. That would be a mess.
    That's called caffenol. How else do you think it was discovered?

    Lee

  10. #10
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    If I use a different film, I cut out a little rectangle of the box and fit the piece of the box with the film information into the camera's flash shoe (which I don't use). Kinda handy for the 120 cameras that don't have a window like the 35mm cameras.
    I do that with all my cameras that dont have info windows, and even tape box end panels on my cameras without either(Duaflexs and ilk)

    I leave the leaders out on my 35mm film and start them into developing reels in room light before going dark, then wind them into the reels. I then cut the film free of the cassett after film is nearly completely on reel. I almost never open film cassetts any more.
    Note: you cannot do this if you are squeaking extra exposures on a roll of 35mm.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

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