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  1. #11
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Shannon, one major difference between digital and film, in terms of exposure. In digital, you tend to have to underexpose in order to not lose highlight detail, and then use your software to correct the tones as needed. With negative film, you have more latitude on the side of overexposure, since the detail on the neg can be burned into the print. Now, I'm not suggesting that you intentionally overexpose by six stops, but you do have take into account the latitude of the equipment you're using.

    Congratulations on "regressing"! Once you get your feet under you, you're going to feel right at home in the analogue world.

  2. #12
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Thanks Cheryl

  3. #13

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    Tmax 400 @ 1600 is just fine processed at 68 deg. F. for 9.25 minutes in xtol, I just did one yesterday.

    Welcome.

    I'm a pilot too -- with time in the Aerobat.
    Imitation cameras come with big egos, real cameras do not include accessories.

  4. #14
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Hi JD, I spent too much money on aerobatics and formation flying so I struggled with my comm instrument rating, giggle.
    Unfortunately I don't process my own film - wouldn't know where to start. The lab has the film and I'll have to ring them first thing tomorrow (Mon) to double check the processing at 1600! Gee I hope it's ok.

  5. #15
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    Unfortunately I don't process my own film - wouldn't know where to start.
    Processing B&W film is exceptionally easy, cheap and gives you a lot more control than leaving it all to a lab. Very little equipment is needed and it is all very readily available (especially with a lot of people converting the other way at the moment!).

    If you're interested then any basic darkroom text will give you the information you need to get started and, of course, a couple of questions on APUG will fill in any blanks.

    All the best (and welcome to the analogue revolution! ),

    Frank

  6. #16
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Thanks Frank! I'm curious to learn about processing my own, but I only have very limited space - actually only an office (with no sinks) which has a 'huge' window! With children I'm also reluctant to use the bathroom with all the chemicals at it is located directly off the kids bedrooms. What does everyone else do under these circumstances?

  7. #17
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    You can always get a dark bag to load film in the tanks, and if you have a sink in a laundry room someplace that's all you really need. You might take a class at a local college or look into places that rent darkroom space. Once you process your own film, you'll want to print as well. (Are you familiar with the "If you Give a Mouse a Cookie" books??) I have small children too, and all the chemicals are well sealed and in the basement. The darkroom is strictly off limits, and the door is usually locked. When I first started to get back into black and white, I shot a lot of chromgenic film, Ilford XP2 and Kodak T-400 CN, and had them commercially processed. I really didn't want the chemicals around before I had the darkroom. When I finally built the darkroom, I have to say, I've had some epic battles making the prints with those negs. A lot was overdeveloped. Now that I am processing my own film, half the battle for printing has been conquered. Good luck with it.

  8. #18
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Hi Suzanne, thanks very much for the advice. I'd love to give it a go. Unfortunately our house is very small, no basements or attics in Australia, and we utilise every nook and cranny. I have a big back yard though
    For my laundry though - how mobile are these units?
    I'm often disappointed with the b&w photos I get back from the lab and I'm sure its not ALL due to pilot error.
    Suzanne, what's the other 'half the battle'?

  9. #19
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    Hi Nicole,

    I was so disappointed with black and white prints back from the lab that I built the darkroom! Actually, the only battle was getting my overly contrasty and overly developed chromogenic film onto fiber paper. I have to say it's a pleasure to print from a well exposed and developed negative with minimum burning and dodging. There is way more latitude to make the prints expressive. Back yard is probably not the most practical , but what a nice place to be, rather than holed up in the pitch black of a darkroom. I must admit, I prefer the darkroom when the weather outside is lousy, and we have plenty of that in New England. Anyway, I think the darkroom rental may be the best bet for the moment, or a class. Or just use the bathroom when the kids are away, and keep the vent going.
    Cheers,
    Suzanne

  10. #20
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Thanks Suzanne!

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