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  1. #21

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    Steve, Rollei IR400 with a 25A filter doesn't look much different than any other panchromatic film with a 25A filter. It is an expensive film (10 bucks a roll last I shot it). I wouldn't bother using it unless it is with heavier filters than a 25A. It is not unique unless you use it with an opaque filter, or a near-opaque one like the R72. Without a heavy filter, it might as well be T-Max in the camera, IMO.

    HIE, on the other hand, definitely looked like an IR film when used with a 25 or 29 see-through filter. That was HIE's greatest strong point IMO: it could be used hand held with IR-looking results, and without having to shift focus.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Steve, Rollei IR400 with a 25A filter doesn't look much different than any other panchromatic film with a 25A filter. It is an expensive film (10 bucks a roll last I shot it). I wouldn't bother using it unless it is with heavier filters than a 25A. It is not unique unless you use it with an opaque filter, or a near-opaque one like the R72. Without a heavy filter, it might as well be T-Max in the camera, IMO.

    HIE, on the other hand, definitely looked like an IR film when used with a 25 or 29 see-through filter. That was HIE's greatest strong point IMO: it could be used hand held with IR-looking results, and without having to shift focus.
    This jibes with my experience with the Rollei material. Somewhere I saw a graph of the HIE spectral sensitivity that showed it not only sensitive way farther into the IR spectrum, but also what looked to be a bit of a notch in the yellow green range. Thinking area-under-the-curve stuff I'd guess almost any red filter would skew HIE pretty well towards IR. The Rollei barely makes it into the IR range; I somewhat preferred the effect with a 760 filter over a 720, but that involves working so far down the spectral cut-off it takes a lot of extra exposure and seems a bit touchy for latitude.

    Enh, experiment, experiment. And as pointed out, though the Rollei 400 is a nice pan film, the price of a roll would buy about three of Acros 100!

  3. #23

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    In my experience with infrared films using a Hoya R72 filter, I always meter the visible light and focus, apply the filter, adjust to IR focusing marked on the lens and adjust / bracket +4 to 6 stops. Never had a problem with any infrared film and the results are amazing! As far as ASA/ISO goes, I either follow the retailer's suggestion or set it at 200. I heard with these new IR films in the market today, a Red 25 filter is impracticable but I have never tried it for myself. I am a big fan of EFKE IR820 Aura because it's the closet film to Kodak HIE (R.I.P.).

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