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  1. #1

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    Infrared Film Exposure Question

    Hello:
    I am new to Infrared film photography. I plan on using Rollei IR 400 film and the Hoya R72 filter. My question is that I have read several threads regarding exposure and have gleemed the following: shoot at ISO 25, at approximately 1/2 sec @ f16. My confusion is how do you meter? Do you make your TTL measurement and adjustments before putting the filter on the lens and adjusting 6 - 8 stops or do you measure TTL with filter on?

  2. #2

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    Just my two cents, from what I learned from this forum, the meter can't read infrared light so if you put the filter on first and then measure TTL, it will give you an error instead. There are thing I've learned for Infrared film is: bracket, bracket, bracket, bracket.

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Allen:

    I've got a couple of shots here in my APUG gallery that were shot with Rollei IR 400 film and an R72 filter. Here is an example:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...imageuser=6479

    In my case, I used a Mamiya TLR and a hand meter. One of my successes was metered at EI 3, while another was metered at EI 12.

    It is of course difficult to determine how much IR is included in the light being measured by the meter, but it definitely does change as the light changes, so a suggested standard exposure isn't likely to work consistently - bracket instead.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails forest01d.jpg  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I used a SLR with through the lens meter with a red 25A filter. Direct bright sunlight on the subject. Back lit subjects were a waste of time. I did not bracket and they came out well.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5

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    I never bracket IR film except to set up this procedure.

    I use a RF camera, and set the camera behind the lens meter to 1000 for 400 speed and meter thru the B&W 092 at a subject that needs to be rendered middle grey on print. Or meter deciduous trees or nice green grass and open one stop.

    This works with Leica M and R cameras and the clip on meters. Cameras have SBC cells and clip on has CDS. Both work the same. Any meter made since 1960 has one of these two cell types.

    Multiply your film speed by 2.5 and run the test. If your 072 differs by a little, the meter will compensate.

    Bracketing this expensive film is a waste of $$$.

    My sunny day light exposures were 1/250 at 6.3. Meter or not, this worked every time and I never missed exposure.

  6. #6

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    I may be wrong, not having used IR film for very many years but I recall that a focusing correction was needed. I remember lenses having an indicator. You would focus normally and then move the focus to a line or "r" on the lens.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  7. #7
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Moravec View Post
    I never bracket IR film except to set up this procedure.

    ...

    Bracketing this expensive film is a waste of $$$.
    I totally agree. I used the internal meter in the Nikon F100 set to the box speed [400 for HIE], put on a Red 25A filter. I metered through the filter. I chose subject in direct mid day sun. The back lit and side lit subjects were a waste of film.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Moravec View Post
    My sunny day light exposures were 1/250 at 6.3. Meter or not, this worked every time and I never missed exposure.
    What IR film was this? This speed at this aperture seems very fast compared to what most say is the kind of exposures necessary. Handholding would seem to be a problem for most IR users but clearly not at this speed.

    pentaxuser

  9. #9

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    I have tried metering through the lens with the Hoya R72 filter and the meter does not appear to pick up any light. The filter is really opaque. How does the Hoya R72 filter differ from the Red 25A filter?
    Thanks

  10. #10

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    Ron:
    Since I am new to film photography I am not sure fully understand your response. Are you saying to multiple the Rollei film speed of 400 by 2.5 and set the ISO to 1000 and then meter through the lens with the Hoya R72 filter in place? Thanks

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