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  1. #1
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    One long or many exposures??

    Hi!
    I noticed, Leon, that you did some sort of multiple exposure for your waterfall pictures. You attributed this technique to Les, if I am not mistaken. So if either of you or anyone else who understands this technique could help me out, I'd really appreciate it!

    Here are my questions....why did you do multiple exposures? What is this method (ie..how do you do it)? Is there a time when this method is better than a single long exposure?

    Thanks in advance, oh great masters!
    signed "Grasshopper"
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  2. #2
    Jim Moore's Avatar
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    Take a look at this thread. It will explain everything

    http://www.apug.org/forums/showthrea...light=multiple

    Jim
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"...Wayne Gretzky

  3. #3
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    Thanks, Jim!! It certainly does!
    Jeanette
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BWGirl
    Hi!
    I noticed, Leon, that you did some sort of multiple exposure for your waterfall pictures. You attributed this technique to Les, if I am not mistaken.
    signed "Grasshopper"
    Actually this technique of fragmented exposures is excellent when used carefully.

    It can be seen at it's best in the work of John Blakemore who devised the method for his landscapes in the late 1970's.

    See:
    http://photography.about.com/library...dop_jblake.htm
    http://www.hoopersgallery.co.uk/exhibition.htm

    Les is merely describing the techniques he picked up from John himself.

  5. #5
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Multiple exposures lets you discard all that "Decisive Moment" claptrap and build up images as you see fit.

    Here's a Sample

    or more abstractly

    or with strobe pops and a long exposure:



    I personally prefer between 20 and 40 exposures per frame, so I rate new Velvia at around ISO 3200 and have at it.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  6. #6
    garryl's Avatar
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    I just want to know, if this is of a single subject(e.g. landscape), how you avoided violating the "law of Intermittence"?
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garryl
    I just want to know, if this is of a single subject(e.g. landscape), how you avoided violating the "law of Intermittence"?
    Not sure what you mean but actually in John Blakemore's early images it's the intermittance as apposed to a continous long exposure thats important.

    When you watch a tree in the breeze you see the jerky movement as the wind pulses, his images (many published in 1996 in Inscape) convey this, he might make up a 2 minute exposure with one of a 1/15 seconds, more at an 1/8 some at a 1/30th etc, the combinations are endless.

    The image on this site's homepage by Les McLean is not the best example of the technique as its not far different to the result from a continuos exposure. That may be a little harsh as we are ony seeing a low res version.

    I have used the technique myself and it produces amazing images, if I had a larger scanner I'd scan an exhibition print but at 20"x30" it's too large for an A4 scanner.

    Now coming more upto date John Blakemore has still been using similar techniques for still life images, adding and subtracting obects during the exposures . . . .

  8. #8
    garryl's Avatar
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    The "law of intermittence" states that several short exposures will not produce the same density as one long continuous exposure.

    4 exposures of 1/4 second does not equal an exposure of 1 full second of a object.
    However I see that your trying to show change of movement, so we can esthically
    ignore the law- I guess.
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Yes so you allow a bit but it isn't much if the base subjects the same, it's different when its multiple exposures of different subjects.

  10. #10
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant

    Les is merely describing the techniques he picked up from John himself.


    Just to put the record straight Ian, I was doing the multiple exposure thing a couple of years before I had seen John's work and several years before I met him. As a matter of interest I have spent part of this week with John in Hoopers Gallery hanging his forthcomming show and we had a long discussion about the effects of multiple exposures for John didn't think that lots of multiple exposures where any different from one long exposure. I explained the differences and he concured. If you can make it to the Hoopers Gallery in the next month the show is worth seeing, there are 38 prints of his early landscape photography including a number of multiple exposures on both water and trees.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

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