Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,287   Posts: 1,535,321   Online: 895
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Helinophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    562
    Images
    20

    Metering for landscape photography with Velvia 50 ASA and Hasselblad/Mamiya RZ67?

    Hi

    I have a question regarding your typical cheesy sunset photo, done with Velvia 50 ASA.

    I am a novice in the medium format department, with only 3 rolls of 120 b&w film to show for (you can read my blog about my experience here, haha http://helino-photo.blogspot.com/201...um-format.html )

    Previously I've used 35mm film in my Canon 1v and spot metered a few points in the scene to get a good exposure for my landscape shots.
    This has worked out well.

    However, I now want to try my luck with my newly purchased Hasselblad 503CW and I also have a Mamiya RZ67 pro II on the way in the mail.
    The Mamiya will be my main landscape camera, and the 'Blad' will mostly be used for model photography.

    I've thought about using the Hasselblad for a few landscape tests-shots (I only have the 80mm and a 160mm lens for that, nothing wide).

    Now, the 'Blad' doesn't have a built-in light meter and the only meter I do have, is the Seconic L-358, which doesn't have spot metering.
    This works fine for model photography, but how can I use this for landscape photography, especially when I have the sun in the frame, for example?
    I plan to take shots like this, typically:

    I could always use my 1ds mk II's spot meter to get a few readings, but what did/do people really use?

    Oh, and I have a Cokin-P filter system with grad filters for my 1ds MK II and lenses, is it any way to get it to fit Hasselblad or Mamiya lenses properly?

    Tips/pointers much apperciated. =)
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    12
    Spot-metering is the right answer here; you use whatever spot-meter you have. For some, that's a (D)SLR, for others it's a dedicated 1-degree spot-meter.

  3. #3
    swhiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    37
    There are a few kinds around: Pentax, Sekonic, Minolta. Having one in the bag is the way to go. (The Pentax was Ansel Adams-approved.)

  4. #4
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,614
    Images
    10
    You can somehow substitute a spot meter with your light meter if you measure at very close distance to spots you are interested and close to. In the shot you showed you'd point it both at the rocks in front of you and into the sky above you. You'd measure the sun lit and the shady area of the rocks to get some idea how bright these are in absolute terms and how they would register on your film.

    In the end, all the spot metering won't help you since you can make only one exposure per frame and you can hardly change the contrast of slide film. It only tells you whether a shot can work or not or whether a GND filter helps.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  5. #5
    Helinophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    562
    Images
    20
    Thank you all.

    Rudeofus: Ideed. Normally I use the metering to decide whether to go with 1, 2 og 3 stops of gradfilters (I use gradfilters even on digital some times, even though bracketing and merging is easy-peasy i photoshop). I am unsure if metering (reflected?) objects will be feasible, because in the situation like in the example photo, light levels are very very low (I think that exposure was around 10-15 seconds @ f16, with a 2 stop pola-filter and a 3 stops of grad-filters), my experience is that my Seconic will often put out "Eu" in situations like that. ("Eu" = "what??" )

    Ok, looks like I'm going to bring my 1ds or my 1v with me (I'll probably chicken out and bring my 1ds mk II and make a full test-shot before burning film, even though it is.....cheating ).
    If I was to buy another light meter, I would probably just dish out for a flashmaster or something (I use my light meter a lot in general), but it is rather expensive, so I'll try and make due and hold out as long as possible

    - I will be keeping an eye out and see if I can pick up a good used one that has spot metering, if I can find a really cheap and accurate one, then that will be my hassy-meter

    Kind regards.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    94
    As far as using your Canon filters on your Hasselblad Zeiss lenses, I'm assuming the diameter of your filters aren't too small for the Zeiss glass. With that assumption, you can get inexpensive bayonette mount adapter rings (the size of your filters). I do this and save a bundle on non-bayonette mount filters.

  7. #7
    Helinophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    562
    Images
    20
    Thanks!

    I'll see if I can find some, would be a shame to buy a whole sepearate cokin-set.
    My current cokin (with square nd-filters) fits nicely on my Ø77 lenses on Canon, as far as I can gather, my Carl Zeiss 80mm F2.8 CF T Planar are smaller in size (not sure what the Mamiya lenses are like though, need to check, once I get the things in the mail).

    Good to know there are adapters out there, I like to re-use as much as possible if I can
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,763
    You can buy the 1 degree spot attachment for your Sekonic L-358 or use the lumigrid reflected light 40 degree attachment supplied when bought new, because people were shooting great landscape pictures with normal reflected light meters before spot meters were invented .
    Ben

  9. #9
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Honestly, I would not use slide for this kind of shot, it looks like there's too much contrast. If you do want to use slide, you may succeed, but its more likely that you will need to use a graduated neutral density filter or two. I would use one of the 160 print films. Why don't you try that side-by-side with slide and see what grabs you.

    And I wouldn't bother to spot meter. My cheap gossen gives me contrast range and that's all I'd need for this. Well, that and a reading off my hand or some grey object. But if you have a dslr, now that's a great colour metering implement! And if you really want to meter correctly, you do need to colour meter, I guarantee that the colour temp is not 5000K in this scene.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  10. #10
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by Helinophoto View Post
    Hi

    I have a question regarding your typical cheesy sunset photo, done with Velvia 50 ASA.
    That's why it's called Velveeta (a cheap American cheese)


    But, all seriousness aside...

    Most color shooters just use incident meters. I use a spot meter, but when shooting color (positive), expose for the highlights using the Zone System and don't overly concern myself with the shadows. But shooting sunsets, though rare, is the one time when I prefer to use an incident meter for the entire scene, rather than a spot. You may also be able to incident meter light extremes near to you in order to "spot" extremes, as previously suggested.

    Last weekend I took my LF out and forgot my meter at home. As I am also now learning to use my new digi P&S, I used its spot function to meter. Not as convenient as my Pentax, but after a few translations and calculations, I was able to successfully expose and consequently develop the monochrome sheets from the LF, using the ZS.

    As far as monochrome is concerned, with a little forethought, spot metering and the ZS can be used reasonably with 120 film.
    Last edited by ROL; 10-24-2011 at 11:25 AM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin