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  1. #11
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Boy, I hate to throw a wrench in this, but what the heck. I used to record exposure information with pencil and paper. I have found this info to be generally worthless. At the time of exposure, I note the development required and that's all. I have found it better to develop a technique that is consistant. What worked for me was to photograph the same thing many times. The best thing is getting immediate feedback, either polaroids or going home and printing pictures that you took only hours earlier. Then take that picture back to the same place the next day and do it again.

    I would start by only using one film. For me, a viewing filter helped so that I could learn how to judge what zones would fall where and which one I could judge the best for placement. I place zone 4 most of the time. For constrast measurement, I generally do this on feel unless it is extreme.

    The times that might be good to record, if you could find them when you need them, are how long to expose moving water to get how much blur. That sort of thing would be helpful and I have done those experiments, but there are so many variables there, too, that I'm not sure it isn't better to take a couple of frames/sheets to get the mood you want.

    Just my two bits.

  2. #12
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loose Gravel
    Boy, I hate to throw a wrench in this, but what the heck. I used to record exposure information with pencil and paper. I have found this info to be generally worthless.
    I wouldn't say completely worthless, but grinding so fine as to record each and every exposure will produce a great mound of paper (or electron traces) ... and it will be difficult to reference it all back to the moments of truth - for each and every exposure.

    It is useful - in fact, necessary in the Zone system ... as far as +/- exposure and development; but other than that, one can learn - or see -the effects of f/stops on depth of field and of shutter speeds on motion... but that is general knowledge, and once that is learned (fairly well, anyway) ... minute records are really a lot of overkill.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  3. #13

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    I use a small notebook. I jot down:
    Date
    Brief Subject Description
    Holder Number
    EV range (EV low to EV high, i.e. SBR)
    Lens used
    Filter if any
    F stop
    Exposure length

    Takes me 5 secs to do.
    Francesco

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    I generally don't record shutter speeds/fstop; I've found no compelling reason to do so - although I would be willing to listen if anyone can provide a good reason to do so.

    For myself it's a matter of learning what works and what doesn't - exposure and DOF. When I sit down and examine my photos I want/need to know exactly what I did so that I can assess what I need to do different - the exposure is probably more important than anything else for me as I can usually clearly recall everything else when looking at the photo.

    Perhaps when I'm more experienced and more confident I'll no longer feel a need to record the exposure. I know a lot of pros that say it's pointless, but will recommend it for someone starting out.

  5. #15
    sterioma's Avatar
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    I also use a digital recorder. When I have finished the roll, I write everything down into a spreadsheet which is printed and stapled to the negative archival page.

    As a beginner, I find it extremely useful to review and analyze the pictures I have taken having the exposure data handy. This is especially true when I am trying a new film.
    Last edited by sterioma; 10-26-2004 at 02:25 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    I generally don't record shutter speeds/fstop; I've found no compelling reason to do so - although I would be willing to listen if anyone can provide a good reason to do so.
    I write these things down when shooting stuff I haven't done before. E.g. in my studio I test under- and overexposure with different films. I often shoot heavily overexposed portrait shots for fashion etc., and to have a clue how to shoot very high key it is good to have some test slides with exposure data to learn from. I write the data (shutter speed, aperture and how much it is under - or overexposed) on the slide frame and keep them as references. Then I can find the correct exposure for a shot when I look at slides. The same thing for low-key shooting. I use this mostly with slide film as the latitude is almost non-existing. I have a film in my archive of a female model shot in the three different light settings exposed from -2 stops to +3 stops in ½ stops. That gives 33 exposures covering the spectrum of my likings. From this I can get the appropriate exposure.

    Morten
    Last edited by modafoto; 10-26-2004 at 06:29 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: taipoo

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    I generally don't record shutter speeds/fstop; I've found no compelling reason to do so - although I would be willing to listen if anyone can provide a good reason to do so.
    I use a meter to tell me the low EV and the high EV of a scene. I do not use it to tell me the f stop and shutter speed. There are a countless EV ranges/SBRs - writing down the f stop and speed helps me keep track of all of them so that when I encounter a new one (a new EV range) I can extrapolate the correct exposure from looking at my notes. This is particularly useful when the low EVs registers 3, 2 and even 1.
    Francesco

  8. #18

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    I agree with Loose Gravel.

    I don't see much purpose in recording the exposure data for photographs. I'll never take that picture again so what good is the exposure for reference? If I'm testing a new camera, lens or film, I might make a few notes but otherwise, it's not very useful information.

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