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  1. #11
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    Gosh, those blew me away! Thank you!

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Have you never seen a "bride and groom in wine glass photo" from a wedding in the 1970s/1980s?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    Rick A's Avatar
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    For now, you should start with a simple black backdrop, and shoot subjects giving full exposure when they don't touch each other, or splitting the exposure between the number of subjects that overlay one another. Practice makes perfect, and your Yashica D is a wonderful instrument to do it with.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  4. #14

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    I believe Jerry Ulesmann created his images in the darkroom using as many as five enlargers, each with a negative. I have seen some of the actual prints and they are flawless. A few years back I had the experience of French photographer Lucien Clergue photographing a model in my backyard at the time of his exhibition in Coral Gables. He actually made double exposures in camera (a simple Minolta 35mm - maybe a 370). He would go to a museum and photograph paintings or parts of paintings and then re-expose the same roll of film with another subject or model. How he kept track of everything and was able to register the frames was beyond me. The photographs he took of the model in our yard were double exposed with exposures of angels at the Getty museum in L.A. That was in 1995-1996. I did photograph him photographing the model with my wife in the foreground. He handheld the camera and didn't bring a tripod. During a later trip to France we had the pleasure of visiting him at his home in Arles.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #15
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Have you never seen a "bride and groom in wine glass photo" from a wedding in the 1970s/1980s?
    Sorry I haven't, I was born in 1989 and got really interested in photography just a couple of years ago. But I have seen quite a lot of cheesy double exposure pictures on the debut of some of my friends.

    Yeah I'm gonna start with REALLY simple stuff, mostly inanimate objects I can find around the house. I am actually making a list of what would be nice to take a picture of.

    I'll have to stick with the in-camera stuff, as I have yet to take darkroom classes (or the space for a darkroom). I'll look up on Lucien Clergue. Thank you.

  6. #16
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    There is an APUGer that did a photograph for Bessler in the early 1980's it was all done in camera a nude reflected on a chrom ball, and a few other effects.

    This is what I keep going on about, the thrill is gone to some extent. There is some stunning complicated digital work being done, but this in-camera work of old is well...... working without a net.

    Simply shooting a day long assignment and waiting a day for the chromes was exhilerating, never spent the money until the chromes came back, and you held your breath till they did.

    Remember sending super complicated stuff to the lab in batch A and B, telling them not to soup B until A was done, I would switch backs on the Hasselblad making sure complicated stuff was on two separate rolls.

    Thanks to OP for posting these images, has me energized to do something new, something the digital shooters can not offer folks.
    This middle age horse may just have something left to offer discerning clients.

  7. #17
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    I wonder if they aren't photos of photos? Would be easier to line up photos than all those subjects, especially the butterflies and the lion seems to be prints.

    I mean that the photographer has taken double exposures of different prints rather than live subjects, it seems like it in some cases.

  8. #18
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    In my gallery here, there's a shot of a gerber daisy - it's a double exposure of the same gerber. Both were exposed at a "correct" exposure. Once you start playing with it, it leads to more ideas.

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