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  1. #11
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Light Guru View Post
    If this government shutdown happens then you will have an even bigger problem. All the national parks would be closed.
    Yeah, but then weigh that up against the fact that the glaciers might not be there in 10-20 years, gotta see it while you can...
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  2. #12

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    The average tourist isn't going to be able to access glaciers off-season, and in some respects they're hard to appreciate when everything else
    is covered with snow too. Even road travel deserves some premeditation as things cool down. I wouldn't travel anywhere in that part of the
    world even in summer without a good sleeping bag and extra food and water in the car. I've been in blizzards in summer numerous times. We've
    already had temps fall into the teens even here in our Calif Mtns.

  3. #13

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    We were there last winter for New Year's. We stayed just outside the part at Hungry Horse and went in for the day snowshoeing at Lake MacDonald. I believe the highway was used as a snowshowing cross country skiing as far as Avalanche Creek but as my wife and I had not been on snowshoes for decades we were conservative on where we went.

    There were lots of people around Lake MacDonald, almost as many people as ravens We may do it again this year, depending more on if our friends wish to do it again

  4. #14

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    I'd imagine the remaining glaciers are pretty small. It's a beautiful park by any standard, but once the glaciers die, the turquoise color of the
    adjacent lakes will also be gone, because it is the runoff of glacial rock flour which lends that effect. We've lost a lot of our smaller glaciers in
    the Sierras too, but because of the greater altitude and higher moisture content of the snowstorms, there are a few places they're still relatively healthy. But these are all cirque glaciers, up in shaded pockets under high peaks, and take some serious effort to get to. Some of the glaciers in the Cascades have taken even a harder hit. I can remember glissading almost two miles on one twenty years ago, that is now completely gone.

  5. #15
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    I have been told that the best access to Glacier Park is via Canada where they have winter tours by "Ice Buggy" across the glaciers. They also offer transportation to the US. In the winter there are Amtrak stops and in the summer there are 3. Also, Amtrak will make a special stop at any time at the Walton Inn. This is a flag stop for pickup and a prior notification for anyone with reservations at the inn.

    PE

  6. #16

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    An excellent recent documentary was made about the grizzly attacks back in the 60's, with interviews of surviving victims as well as rescue
    crew. It was inevitable due to the artificial feeding of bears as entertainment common in the Natl Parks during that era. But by far the most
    dangerous animal in Yellowstone are bison bulls, not grizzlies; and statistically, by far the most fatalities in Glacier NP are due to drowning.
    Those glacial streams are pretty vigorous, and careless snowmobiling is infamous for drowning incidents too, when those things cave into
    frozen-over creeks and ditches.

  7. #17
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    Elk and Moose attacks are also quite common I have been told.

    PE

  8. #18

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    I'm just waiting for a nosey photographer to get gored by a bull elk out here at Pt Reyes. They are not aggressive animals, but unlike deer,
    the bulls form a perimeter watch around the herd and calves in particular. I've seen a lot of wannabee wildlife photographers try to wiggle their
    way inside that zone. ... maybe not the brightest idea. Bison bulls on the other hand are just like barnyard bulls, only more unpredictable. I
    wouldn't want to be behind a red darkcloth with one of them in the foreground! I've already been treed by enough ordinary bulls in my lifetime.

  9. #19
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    As a student in Missoula we went to Glacier a lot, and some of the best trips were in the Fall because of the beautiful colors, sparse visitors, and often a photogenic snowfall on the high peaks. October can have a long stretch of beautiful dry clear weather. We used to go climbing as late as Thanksgiving, and snowshoeing after that. It can be really good as long as you are self-contained.

    There is an interesting photog link here: One year we climbed Heaven's Peak Ridge and while I climbed the actual peak my buddy took a 35 mm slide of lenticular clouds that fed him for many years. It was a bright orange sunset above jagged peaks. They captioned it "Montana, Land of Beginnings", and he sold thousands of prints throughout the 1980's and 1990's.

    So this time of year can be favorable for photos; the best ones tend to be weather related: right as a front is moving in, or as the front is clearing off. Clear blue skies require a bit more creativity...

    Fall always was my favorite time to go to Glacier!

    Did you hear that the sea ice grew by 29% in 2013? Probably not. Big time denial going on amongst the warming crowd.

  10. #20

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    I'm not going to go into a detailed debate with the Flat Earth Society about this, but I was doing research papers on this kind of thing way back in the 1960's, and lo and behold, the oil companies themselves were doing most of the funding for the hard data way back then, and still do, concerning what they themselves consider the inevitable. They were already planning how to engineer for arctic thaw as a FACT, because they had the most to gain or lose from it monetarily, despite the payoffs they make to politicians in the lower forty-eight to deny it, simply because they don't want to clean up the refineries here. Better do some actual homework into real science instead of the Faux News Network before you tangle with a subject like this. Glaciers are shrinking all over the world at an accelerated rate, with just a few exceptions. Maybe 2/3 of them that I've set foot on in my lifetime are now gone.

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