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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by drgoose View Post
    Now this is apples and oranges.
    what i am getting at ..

    it is easy to act like kind of a jerk, even though it is perfectly legal.
    (im suggesting the other guy acted like a jerk, you actually acted with tact, which is highly iregular with photographers
    seeing we have a camera, and we think every view is ours for the taking, and to hell with the people who say NO )

    its a fine line ...
    Last edited by jnanian; 05-09-2014 at 09:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #52
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Just to return to this for a moment. If you have a film camera then the only thing you can do to comply with your delete/destroy /surrender is to take the whole film out, expose to light and destroy the whole roll

    Are you saying you'd do this even if the other 15/35 frames were not of the person who objected to the photo after you had taken the exposure? Your quote above implies that this was an after-the-event occurrence. If you had checked with the person in advance and he/she had objected then none of the above options of delete/destroy/ surrender would have arisen.

    If the picture is taken with a digital camera it is simple to show the person, who is objecting, the picture and delete in his presence. No such method is open to a film photographer.

    He/she can either destroy the whole film or at best persuade the objector that he will faithfully return the negative to the objector, promising to have made no prints of the offending negative.

    [...]


    The first sentence is absolutely true. In Australia any photography of restricted areas, including airside aviation features, planes on the tarmac etc., engineering, is prohibited. This also includes passengers inside the plane photographing anything outside the window when taxiing to the terminal. If a photographer photographs something and is stopped by ground or plane crew, he/she will be asked to delete those images (in the presence of those/that staff member). If it is on film, the film will have to be surrendered — there is no second option.You will potentially lose everything on that roll (there have apparently been a lot of this happening in Perth, Sydney and Brisbane!), not just the dramatic angles featuring planes etc. The photography is not allowed, and that's it — there is no half-way point of giving an undertaking to separate the offending photographs from the rest of the benign images on the roll of film. The onus is on the photographer to be aware of regulations and rules and adhere to them. There will always be rambo types in photography thinking they can do what they want — to some extent it is their actions which have painted all other photographers with the same brush.


  3. #53
    zk-cessnaguy's Avatar
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    No real restrictions here in NZ, except (from memory) in Customs sand immigration. When I was based in Queenstown, we'd (politely) stop people from taking pictures when embarking/disembarking the aircraft as they were crossing the tarmac. This was purely for the reasons of safety and to get the passengers off the operational area in an orderly fashion. Once they were (still airside btw) on the walkway behind the railings they were more than welcome to take as many photographs as they wished.
    There is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Just to return to this for a moment. If you have a film camera then the only thing you can do to comply with your delete/destroy /surrender is to take the whole film out, expose to light and destroy the whole roll

    Are you saying you'd do this even if the other 15/35 frames were not of the person who objected to the photo after you had taken the exposure? Your quote above implies that this was an after-the-event occurrence. If you had checked with the person in advance and he/she had objected then none of the above options of delete/destroy/ surrender would have arisen.

    If the picture is taken with a digital camera it is simple to show the person, who is objecting, the picture and delete in his presence. No such method is open to a film photographer.
    Well, if you have a camera with multiexposure, you can just blank the frame with a long exposure.

    If not, you'll have t discuss a solution with the other person. But ultimately I would give up the film if necessary. It's never happened, but I would. The photographer is responsible for his photos and the loss of the roll would be on the photographer.

    I behave respecfully with a camera and I have not had any confrontations at all. I have deleted a few digital images because the subject was uncomfortable with the way they came out in the photo, but it was done in a mutually friendly tone.

  5. #55
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    what i am getting at ..

    it is easy to act like kind of a jerk, even though it is perfectly legal.
    (im suggesting the other guy acted like a jerk, you actually acted with tact, which is highly iregular with photographers
    seeing we have a camera, and we think every view is ours for the taking, and to hell with the people who say NO )

    its a fine line ...
    This is very true.

    If someone behaves like a jerk with a camera (to assert his civil rights or whatever) then three things will happen:

    (1) He will give himself a bad name
    (2) He will give other photograpers a bad name
    (3) He will have difficulty taking any good pictures

    How could anyone want that?

  6. #56
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    When I was boarding a jet couple of years ago, I asked the pilot sitting in the cockpit if I could take a couple of pictures. He turned my way, smiled and told me to shoot away.

    Here is U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) official policy regarding photography and filming. Of course, individual airports might have different policies. Why not just check with the police when you get to the airport to see if there will be any problems?
    Photography/Filming


    TSA does not prohibit the public, passengers or press from photographing, videotaping or filming at security checkpoints, as long as the screening process is not interfered with or slowed down. We do ask you to not film or take pictures of the monitors. While the TSA does not prohibit photographs at screening locations, local laws, state statutes, or local ordinances might.

    Taking photographs may also prompt airport police or a TSA official to ask what your purpose is. It is recommended that you use the Talk To TSA program on tsa.gov to contact the Customer Support Manager at the airport to determine its specific policy. Or, if you are a member of the press, you should contact the TSA Office of Public Affairs.
    .
    Latest revision: 12 March 2014


    https://www.tsa.gov/pressroom-channe...ographyfilming

  7. #57
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Here is the link for the Port Authority of NY and NJ. (PONYA) They run Kennedy and Newark Int'l Airports and LaGuardia as well as marine ports, rails, etc in the NYC Metro area. Notice that their restrictions are only for terminals they run like the International Arrivals Building at Kennedy. Individual terminals owned and operated by airlines such as Delta, British Airways, Jet Blue, etc. have their own rules. I'm not a lawyer, but since these are privately owned terminals, I believe they are legally entitled to make their own rules while you are in their property. This link provides phone numbers of who to call to get information in advance. Click on the Videotaping/Photographing at Port Authority Facilities tab.
    http://www.panynj.gov/press-room/media-access.html

  8. #58

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    The link above is intended fir news organizations. Not for the public in general.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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