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  1. #11

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    Another consideration about this topic, if you want to get a good photo of an archeological site, don't mind if it's in Mexico or if you are using a tripod, you need the best light. The best time in Oaxaca, and I don't want to make an issue of it, is early in the morning, 7 to 9 a.m. or 6 to 8:30 p.m. (in summer time). At this time, either it is early in the morning or late in the afternoon, you have to ask for a permission to be in the premisses of the archeological site.
    Jose A. Martinez

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose A Martinez
    I think that you miss the point here, you can photograph in Mexico anything, but 'without' a tripod in an official or historical place, which means that you can photograph any historical place in Mexico, but you CAN NOT USE A TRIPOD. Using a tripod means that you are a "professional photographer", and for that reason you have to get a permission, that you can get if you fulfill the requirements. And of course, you can get "A LOT" of images out of Oaxaca and the rest of Mexico, if you are good enough. A tripod is not a problem.
    No, you (and INAH) miss the point. Using a tripod does not mean that I am a professional photographer. In fact, I am not, though I use large format equipment that requires the use of a tripod.

    And the issue is not simply requesting the permission. I have done that in dozens of places in France and in Spain, where the process can be handled locally at a city or provincial level. In Mexico, unfortunately, it can only be done through D.F., and the process can be both complicated and very long. And, more often than not, it is a question of one incompetent and uncaring person passing off the baton to another incompetent and uncaring person.

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 06-03-2005 at 11:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose A Martinez
    I think that you miss the point here, you can photograph in Mexico anything, but 'without' a tripod in an official or historical place, which means that you can photograph any historical place in Mexico, but you CAN NOT USE A TRIPOD. Using a tripod means that you are a "professional photographer", and for that reason you have to get a permission, that you can get if you fulfill the requirements. And of course, you can get "A LOT" of images out of Oaxaca and the rest of Mexico, if you are good enough. A tripod is not a problem.
    Sorry Jose, but I disagree. No matter how good I am, I cannot hand hold a 12x20 inch camera and get a good picture. I am not surprised at King's opinion. It is not so much the permit, but the difficulty and down right arrogance these people exhibit. You have to remember we all pay taxes in one form or another, and that these taxes go to pay their salaries and the mantainance of these places, it is time that Mexicans, and specially goverment employees realize that they are not doing us a favor, that in fact their job is to facilitate and help the citizens as well as tourists. This is why Mexico will never be a first world country, due to their cavalier and down right desinterest about the importance of time.

    I dont see why they cannot issue permits on the spot. As with everything in Mexico, this "permit" is nothing more than another scam to get money and to keep busy the morons working there. I have photographed in many places in the US, one of them was Puerto Rico, in their fortress when I took my camera and tripod a park ranger asked me the purpose of the photographs, all I had to say these were personal pictures and he left me alone. Try that here? it is all well and good for you who uses a 35 mm camera to say that it is no big deal all you have to do is not use a tripod. For the rest of us who use LF cameras this is a big deal.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose A Martinez
    Hi Jorge, I just have this conversation with David at diner (by the way, we had a great diner at "El Naranjo", his treat) and I told him that this is the law since I remember. I couldn't take a photo in Monte Alban or Mitla or Dainzu with a tripod, EVER. Thats it. I don't know if you go in front of the Capitol at Washington, D.C. with a tripod and nobody stop you, but six year ago, I went to "The Galleria" at Houston, TX. and set my tripod in order to get a photo of the skate ring, and before I set the exposure, a guard approached me with his hand in his gun and asked me for my permission to do so.
    The Galleria in Houston is private property and as such they have the right to request that you do not take pictures. This is not the case for national parks and monuments. You can go ahead and place your tripod right in front of the Lincoln memorial or the Washington monument and you will not have a problem.

    You can go to the anazasi ruins and do the same, you might be required to get a permit that the park ranger will issue on the spot.

    This is not the same thing Jose, I am not surprised at the impression King has, I am of the same opinion.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    Sorry Jose, but I disagree. No matter how good I am, I cannot hand hold a 12x20 inch camera and get a good picture. I am not surprised at King's opinion. It is not so much the permit, but the difficulty and down right arrogance these people exhibit. You have to remember we all pay taxes in one form or another, and that these taxes go to pay their salaries and the mantainance of these places, it is time that Mexicans, and specially goverment employees realize that they are not doing us a favor, that in fact their job is to facilitate and help the citizens as well as tourists. This is why Mexico will never be a first world country, due to their cavalier and down right desinterest about the importance of time.

    I dont see why they cannot issue permits on the spot. As with everything in Mexico, this "permit" is nothing more than another scam to get money and to keep busy the morons working there. I have photographed in many places in the US, one of them was Puerto Rico, in their fortress when I took my camera and tripod a park ranger asked me the purpose of the photographs, all I had to say these were personal pictures and he left me alone. Try that here? it is all well and good for you who uses a 35 mm camera to say that it is no big deal all you have to do is not use a tripod. For the rest of us who use LF cameras this is a big deal.

    Jorge, I don't want to discuss about it, but it is not the same to photograph "El Morro" at San Juan, that photograph "The Capitol" in DC. I wonder if you need a permission to photograph, with a tripod, the "Lincoln Memorial", if they will granted the permission right in the spot, but of course, "Monte Alban" is not "Lincoln Memorial".

    Maybe we live in a corrupt country, but rules are rules, and laws are laws, no matter what country you live.

    Sorry, but those are the rules in Mexico, and, if you want to take a picture of Monte Alban with a 12x20" camera, you need to apply for a permission, not only to photograph with a tripod, also to get there out of official hours.
    Jose A. Martinez

  6. #16

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    ok, I don't want to discusse this anymore, but, use this as an add in this forum:

    "In this corrupt country as Mexico is, don't think that you can photograph an arqueological site with a tripod if you don't have a permission to do so, it's law!"
    Jose A. Martinez

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose A Martinez
    Jorge, I don't want to discuss about it, but it is not the same to photograph "El Morro" at San Juan, that photograph "The Capitol" in DC. I wonder if you need a permission to photograph, with a tripod, the "Lincoln Memorial", if they will granted the permission right in the spot, but of course, "Monte Alban" is not "Lincoln Memorial".

    Maybe we live in a corrupt country, but rules are rules, and laws are laws, no matter what country you live.

    Sorry, but those are the rules in Mexico, and, if you want to take a picture of Monte Alban with a 12x20" camera, you need to apply for a permission, not only to photograph with a tripod, also to get there out of official hours.
    Sorry Jose, but rules are rules and laws are laws only when it benefits the goverment and not the citizens. It is in fact the same to photograph the Capitol in Washington and El morro in San juan, both are public properties supported by the tax payer and as such the tax payer is entitled to use them and photograph them. This exactly is the problem in Mexico, the laws are made so that they increase revenue into the goverment without any benefit to the citizens. The least they could do is make these laws so that people do not waste their time, given that they are wasting their money.

    Accepting the problem is the first step towards fixing it. Just because it is a foreigner the one who criticised our goverment institution does not make it wrong. In fact I venture to say that it is sad that this is the impression an educated person has of the Mexican goverment.

    You say laws are laws, and rules are rules. This does not mean the laws and rules are right, by adopting a desinterested attitude you become part of what makes this country so bad. Sorry, I cannot defend an institution that is riddled with inefficiency, ineptitud and arrogance and just shrug my shoulders and take it. This is fact is the difference between practicing democracy and just paying it lip service. If the same thing had happened to King in the US, I bet you he would have been next day writing to his congressmen, and his letter would have been acknowledged. Here, nobody in the goverment gives a shit about what the citizens have to say......it is time to change this, and the only way to do it is by starting to complain and demand that the institutions become accountable to the citizen, not to the politicians.

  8. #18

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    May I be clear, are we talking about George Bush?

  9. #19

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    seriously, I think you are making a fuss out of it, if you want to photograph in an archeological site in Mexico with a tripod, YOU NEED A PERMISSION. Period.
    Jose A. Martinez

  10. #20

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    On the subject, a thread that may help in this matter:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/showthrea...cial+buildings
    Jose A. Martinez

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