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  1. #1
    BradS's Avatar
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    California: Wild flower report

    Wild flower season is upon us. I thought it would be interesting to hear what's blooming in your area.

    Here in the S.F. Bay area, we've had poppies for a couple of weeks already. I don't think thatthey've peeked yet however. The ice plant along I-680 is just coming into bloom. Maybe next week?

    What's happening in your area? I's especially lik eto hear from somebody in Kern county.

  2. #2

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    Brad,
    This is actually a *very* interesting idea. I wonder if we can get a map or something - like they have on the weather channel in the fall to show fall color peaks - to list various enviromental/seasional occurances (flowers, cherry blossoms, etc).
    Here in Northern DE/South East PA, the flowers started about a week ago to bloom. Bulbed types opened mid last week, and the wildflowers just started yesterday.

    Regards,

  3. #3
    kaiyen's Avatar
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    I'm not sure where Kern County is, actually, but...I found this report online:

    http://www.calphoto.com/wflower.htm

    Looks like we're a bit behind schedule, or perhaps just not looking so good...

    I'll be going to the Pinnacles with some fellow photo-clubbers next month. Hopefully it'll be pretty there.

    allan

  4. #4
    MattCarey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiyen
    I'm not sure where Kern County is, actually, but...I found this report online:

    http://www.calphoto.com/wflower.htm

    Looks like we're a bit behind schedule, or perhaps just not looking so good...

    I'll be going to the Pinnacles with some fellow photo-clubbers next month. Hopefully it'll be pretty there.

    allan
    Kern County covers a big area from Bakersfield, through the southern Sierra, and into the Mojave desert. It is hard to consider it one place!

    The trees along I5 in the central valley were flowering a few weeks back. It was pretty much over a week ago when I was driving through. The mustard (I think) plants in the orchards near the old IBM/San Jose plant are going gangbusters. I would expect that to be the same throughout the Santa Clara valley.

    Poppies are not very prominent around my area. Some are out, but not as much as previous years.

    I'll be driving down to Bakersfield in a week. I'll see what it is like then.

    Matt

  5. #5
    rbarker's Avatar
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    I thought I saw a sprout of a wildflower last week here in Rio Rancho, but it turned out to be a weed in my rawn (lawn made of rocks).
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  6. #6
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattCarey
    The trees along I5 in the central valley were flowering a few weeks back. It was pretty much over a week ago when I was driving through. The mustard (I think) plants in the orchards near the old IBM/San Jose plant are going gangbusters. I would expect that to be the same throughout the Santa Clara valley. Matt
    re: Trees - Yeah, we drove up (out?) to Oakdale a few weeks ago. All the almond orchards were in bloom. Absolutely stunning!. I would imagine that the bloom is off the bud now though.

    There is a field of mustard (?) weed growing along I-680 in Fremont. Must be 10 acres of bright yellow. Hope to get out and about this weekend to photgraph some of this stuff. My accountant is workign though so, not sure if I'll have the opportunity in my role as Mr. Mom.

  7. #7
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    There is a field of mustard (?) weed growing along I-680 in Fremont. Must be 10 acres of bright yellow.
    Sounds more like canola (rapeseed).
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #8
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    Sounds more like canola (rapeseed).
    This particular field is really kinda funny. Every year about this time it erupts in a flood of bright yellow. The owner mows it and the yellow plants return in a few weeks. Later in the season, it is planted with, what I assume, is the cash crop...wheat perhaps? Anyway, the "flowers" are obviously just a nuisance to the farmer. I suspect he considers them to be weeds.

  9. #9
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Actually the mustard plants are a great organic version of replenishment/fertilizer/nitrogen fixing plant. They just cut it and let it compost itself in places like farms, or vineyards, or they plow it under. It's in the same family as alfalfa. Damn now I am showing my farmer's daughter roots.

    BTW in the valley's here the flowers are just starting. On the mountains (real ones) it will be late June before they start.
    Non Digital Diva

  10. #10
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    Actually the mustard plants are a great organic version of replenishment/fertilizer/nitrogen fixing plant. They just cut it and let it compost itself in places like farms, or vineyards, or they plow it under. It's in the same family as alfalfa. Damn now I am showing my farmer's daughter roots.

    BTW in the valley's here the flowers are just starting. On the mountains (real ones) it will be late June before they start.
    Ah, sounds something like the corn farmers do with the soy beans.



 

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