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  1. #1
    BradS's Avatar
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    Photography in the Rainforest

    I'll be returning to Ecuador again this winter. This time, we'll be travelling down the Napo river aboard a river boat. There will be day hikes into the jungle.

    As this is not primarily a photo trip, I'll be travelling light (photographically) and only plan to bring a 35mm SLR and a few lenses at most.

    I'm wondering what to expect. There just isn't much written about the jungle from a photographer's point of view. Anybody have any suggestions or stories to share?

  2. #2
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    I'll be returning to Ecuador again this winter. This time, we'll be travelling down the Napo river aboard a river boat. There will be day hikes into the jungle.

    As this is not primarily a photo trip, I'll be travelling light (photographically) and only plan to bring a 35mm SLR and a few lenses at most.

    I'm wondering what to expect. There just isn't much written about the jungle from a photographer's point of view. Anybody have any suggestions or stories to share?
    HAving done a rainforest in Venezuela, take a very non permeable outfit with you. I froze my butt off in a downpour that I thought only a jacket would protect me. Also have plenty of good cover for your camera. They make those funky little rain jacket thingys for cameras. Take silicon dry packets with you. A cheap source is a shoe store. They usually have lots that they end up throwing away, that were in the shoe boxes. Take plastic bags that seal tight to put things like your film into. Warm shoes that are waterproof. Extra socks. Baseball cap that won't fall apart in the rain. Gloves, it gets cold in the downpours. Dress in layers. When it stops raining it gets hot and very humid like a steam bath. Have fun. I would do it all again in a heart beat.
    Non Digital Diva

  3. #3
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Hi Brad,

    No tripod? In any case, as Aggie has alluded, you may want to look into the Ewa rain cape to keep the camera dry. If taking a tripod consider a good case like the Think Tank Bazooka that I just posted about:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum45/33539-think-tank-bazooka-tripod-case.html

    Also, if taking the camera and tripod, consider big bags (heavier mill) to place over the camera and tripod to protect the rig until the rain stops.

    You may want to consider an eVent rather than a Gortex shell and a an eVent or Gortex base ball type or other hat. eVent breathes better than Gortex.

    As Aggie says bring/dress in layers, you may want a light fleece or wool sweater to keep warm when it is raining and cools. Extra socks definitely.

    Follow a lot of Aggies'additional comments.

    Have fun. Look forward to seeing some of the photos.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  4. #4
    Aggie's Avatar
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    I forgot one little trick as well. Take some garbage bags with you. They fold up very small, and make great ground cover while you put your bag down for a shot. You need two so one can be on the ground, while the toher is over the top of the camera bag.

    Take heavy duty bug spray. Thos critters are fierce. It's not the big ones, but the little suckers that are the worst.
    Last edited by Aggie; 11-06-2006 at 11:48 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: forgot another one
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  5. #5
    roteague's Avatar
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    Don't forget to take a warming polarizer with you. These do wonderful things in the rainforest - along with plenty of Velvia of course, and perhaps some Provia 400F as well.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #6
    BradS's Avatar
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    Aggie, hmmm...I guess I hadn't thought much about the *RAIN* part of the rainforest. Was thinking of taking the Nikon kit but perhaps, the old spotmatic will get the call...Thanks for all of the good tips.

    Rich, I'll probably not bring a tripod. Was thinking that the monopod would suffice in most places. It easily tucks into a crevace in my suitecase and it's nice to have in Quito too. Doesn't immediately identify me as a target to the horde of pre-adolecent thieves.

    I also love those big zip-lock bags. Will bring enough for my own personal use and a few extra boxes. Last trip, they were as good as hard cash when trading with the locals.

    Robert, Velvia's just not my favorite. Was thinking about Provia but maybe that's not such a stellar choice for the low light I'm sure we'll encounter.

  7. #7
    roteague's Avatar
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    You may have a bit of problem without a tripod. It can get quite dark, which is why I suggested Provia 400F.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #8
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Hi Brad,

    Those multi second photos without faster film or a tripod are pretty tough hand held (or even on a monopod). Roberts suggestion for the Provia 400F looks like a good one.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  9. #9
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Delta 3200 possibly?
    Marko Kovacevic
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  10. #10
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    definitely take a fully manual camera. use a seperate light meter that stays in a double zip-lock bag or some such thing. make sure you don't leave your cameras in AC rooms if possible. I've spent a lot of time in the Borneo Jungles photographing and these are the things I have found work for me. Oh ya keep your film in a zip lock with some of those moisture absorbing packets.
    www.ericrose.com
    yourbaddog.com

    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

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