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  1. #21
    hughitb's Avatar
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    I don't know if you are looking for suggestions about where to go in Chile for photography but if you are I would have a few small ones for you.

    Firstly, as someone said already, the extreme south is the place to go for spectacular ice/mountain landscapes. When I was there, I took the advice of a local and only went about 2/3 of the way down. This was a bad idea. You should fly right down to the southern tip if you can.

    Secondly, Santiago is not a particularly interesting city visually. Valparaiso which is not too far away from there, is much better. It's got a fabulous faded grandeur about it. I only got to spend an afternoon there but wanted to stay for weeks. People in Santiago might tell you that it is grotty and dangerous but I would take this with a pinch of salt.

    Have a great trip!

  2. #22
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Valparaiso is well worth visiting, the old part above the port and the funicular railways, particularly Pablo Neruda's house. All 3 of Neruda's houses are open to the public but no cameras allowed.

    Ian

  3. #23

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    A lot depends on the type of photography too. Travel/People/places/street tends to consume a lot more film than landscape shooting in my experience.

    In Kabul, sometimes I shoot one roll of 120 in a couple of hours. Other times I have shot eight rolls in an hour and a half if a lot is happening and I have diverse goals.

    I am about to head to India for just over 2 weeks. Planning on taking about 100 rolls of 120. TriX400 & Delta 100 as staples (with some delta 3200 and a few rolls of Velvia thrown in), but poss also some Foma 200 and Delta 400 depending on how some recent test rolls look. I am intrigued to see how Foma 200 looks combined with very old world scenery.

  4. #24

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    A lot depends on the type of photography too. Travel/People/places/street tends to consume a lot more film than landscape shooting in my experience.

    In Kabul, sometimes I shoot one roll of 120 in a couple of hours. Other times I have shot eight rolls in an hour and a half if a lot is happening and I have diverse goals.

    I am about to head to India for just over 2 weeks. Planning on taking about 100 rolls of 120. TriX400 & Delta 100 as staples (with some delta 3200 and a few rolls of Velvia thrown in), but poss also some Foma 200 and Delta 400 depending on how some recent test rolls look. I am intrigued to see how Foma 200 looks combined with very old world scenery.

  5. #25
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    100 rolls of 120 is a pretty significant amount of film to carry and process. Does your camera shoot 220, and is there a film you like that comes that way? I've occasionally come back from a trip with around 40-50 rolls of 120, and it's a bit of a slog, even with my largest tank, which holds 6 MF reels. Even if it means having to buy another back, I think it would be worth it to cut your film processing time in half.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #26
    Palantiri7's Avatar
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    I couldn't imagine processing 40-50 rolls myself. Most of the film will be slide film and I am now seriously looking at a 220 back for the Rollei which I will probably source from eBay.

  7. #27
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    220 is great for traveling if available. Chile is a beautiful country and very photogenic. I would not try to buy film there. Even if available, it will be expensive. I would be pretty trigger happy for a month in Chile. Hard to imagine not averaging at least 2 rolls of 120 per day which would be 60 rolls plus another 15 just to be sure. That is 75, or 15 Pro-Packs. That is pretty bulky but 8 x 220 Pro-Packs would be much more manageable. Too bad that 220 is going obsolete.

    Several years ago, in my 35 mm days, I spent 6 months wandering around South America with a bushel of film and a large Pelican/Tundra type case. although heavy, I never regretted having the case with a separate bag for day-to-day use. I assume you will be covering some ground in a month so you could see all sorts of weather/climate in a country like Chile so the indestructible and dustproof case is worth considering. Might be a good place to keep your film if it would fit.

    You have probably already agonized about 4x5 gear. If you are doing static, landscape work, consider taking a lightweight 4x5 and a couple of lenses. If you don't use Readiloads, the sheet film will take up less space than the roll film. A Canham with a 135 mm, 210 mm, +/- a 300 mm Nikkor M will probably weigh less than the medium format gear. 3-4 boxes of 50-sheet film should suffice along with one spare box. With a carbon fiber tripod and an Acratech ballhead you would be reasonably portable. I put my camera gear in a Pelican case with rollers that fits in overhead and I can also check it with no damage. I use a TSA lock also. I check one bag for clothes and stick my tripod in that luggage along with a changing bag. Then I wear a photobackpack temporarily filled with misc stuff until I get to my destination. That way, I can work out of a car with the Pelican case, or switch everything to the backpack for walking. Just some thoughts. Have a great trip.
    Jerold Harter MD

  8. #28
    Palantiri7's Avatar
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    Jerold!!!!! Stop sticking large format back in my head!!!! Argh! Now you've done it. 8-(

    But seriously, yes, you are right about the 4x5 kit being lighter, although less weight may not make up for some of the inconveniences of LF. I'm not as gung-ho as I used to be about photography, so I think the 4x5/8x10 will sit this one out.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    100 rolls of 120 is a pretty significant amount of film to carry and process. Does your camera shoot 220, and is there a film you like that comes that way? I've occasionally come back from a trip with around 40-50 rolls of 120, and it's a bit of a slog, even with my largest tank, which holds 6 MF reels. Even if it means having to buy another back, I think it would be worth it to cut your film processing time in half.
    The big paterson tanks hold 5 x 120 reels and if you double up (which is easy with most films, but for some reason jams with Neopan 400 on my paterson reels) you get 10 rolls per tank. I agree 220 would be great for space saving - shame so little is available.

    Carry on regs are so tight now, getting your cameras on plus film is the challenge....

  10. #30
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    However many pix you think you would take with your 8x10, multiply that by 12. One roll of film per each sheet of 8x10 that you would normally shoot. A bit silly to do it so mathematically, but it would probably work just fine for you, if you really are used to making your shots "count".

    I second the suggestion of Valparaiso/Vina del Mar. The ascensores are amazing.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 09-25-2008 at 02:52 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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