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  1. #21
    Tom Nutter's Avatar
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    Good to know all is not lost. Thanks for the info. Maybe I can actually resume my street photography project.
    Last edited by Tom Nutter; 08-24-2009 at 11:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    I think the rangers in that park are particularly difficult. I've been accosted there twice whilst using MF on a tripod , and whilst I have eventually persuaded them that I wouldn't sell the images, it was unreasonably hard work and it is clear both that they are sceptical and persistent and that they kind of enjoy being so. As an overseas visitor who loves NYC it creates a poor impression. Its not a "bridges" issue btw; on one occasion I was taking a close up of some rusty doors at the back of the park, away from the water. And it must occur even to them that a terrorist would find it just as easy to get what they need handheld.

    The issue is complicated by the fact that they and people like them ask the wrong question. They tend to enquire whether you are a professional photographer. As it happens I am, but of course not every photograph I make will be used or is intended to be used professionally. Second because they do not understand the difference between Professional photography and Commercial photography. That means that I'm either faced with getting across a complex argument along the lines of "yes I do sell some pictures but I won't sell these ones" or I have to lie to simplify matters, which I kind of resent.

    I''ll sign your letter.

  3. #23

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    i have not forgotten. i have been out of town on work for two days....now i am needing my favorite beer.

    david, i plan to mention that park and the rangers by name in my perxonal letter as i thgink they need a good clarification for sure.

    stay tuned.

    eddie
    photoshop is somewhere you go to buy photo equipment.


    lens photos here

  4. #24

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    I was with eddie in Brooklyn that day and can confirm that the NYS Parks Department has equated tripod use with commercial photography. This small park is under the jurisdiction of the New York State Parks Department and not the City parks department. That may be the reason for the varied enforcement of this rule throughout nyc.

    New York City recently went through the process of defining commercial photography that requires a permit. They initially tried to equate tripod use with commercial photography (& filming) but changed their definition after outcries (mostly from amateur filmmakers). This policy can be found here:

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/film/downloa...ules_final.pdf

    I think this policy is fair and makes more sense than a ban on tripod use. It allows tripod use in most instances including on sidewalks. It is clear in scope and therefore can be easily enforced.

    I will be writing the to Parks Department, requesting they adopt the NYC policy. I agree with eddie that more letters will help the cause. I will post my letter once it is written.

  5. #25

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    I have had problems in the UK, too. Exactly the same sort of thing, the assumption that tripod = commercial.

    I know of a guy, not me, who rang and asked before he attended an event at a stately home if photography was permitted. He was told yes, but not commercial photography - and no tripods. He arrived with his manual SLR, but when trying to enter the security guard refused him entry because he had a 'professional camera'. I think it was something like a Nikon F3 - maybe a pro's tool 15 years ago... anyone with a plastic camera or compact was allowed in, anyone with anything large and metal was not. He had to leave his camera in the car (in the carpark with the 'take all your valuables with you' signs) and take his compact in with him instead...
    Steve

  6. #26
    Uncle Goose's Avatar
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    Boy it sure seems that the boots of the anti-photo Gestapo are pounding harder and harder each day. Luckily in Belgium there aren't stupid laws like that, you may photograph wherever you want with whatever you want if you are on public grounds. Only exception is certain zones in the harbor (because they are under lease of companies) and train stations (although it's not very enforced since it's all about an old law from 1913 against spying, pretty outdated nowadays). Last week I was photographing a cokes factory in the French speaking part of Belgium and I was approached by 2 cops on motorcycle. After the usual ID check they told me it was forbidden to take photographs of industrial site. So I told them I was on public property and that I may photograph whatever the hell I wanted. So they started to look in the lawbooks they carry with them and after a few minutes standing there looking in the books they packed things up, said "have a good day" and left. they couldn't find a thing against photographing industrial sites.
    Sure, I could give you a boring explanation who I really am but I rather let the Origami do the talking.

  7. #27

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    Same here in the northern bit of the Low Countries, across the border from Uncle Goose: the only restriction is that you may not cause an obstruction in a public place. (Without having a permit that says you can, that is.)
    Putting up a tripod in itself is not causing an obstruction. People have to start falling over it, with no other choice left, before it is.
    On private property (including musea, churches, and what have you) the rules are set by the owner, of course.
    I have yet to come across a privately owned bit of land (i hesitate to use the word "nature", since we have no such thing in our country. Everything is 'managed landscape' at best), opened to the public, that has a tripod or photography ban.

  8. #28
    gr82bart's Avatar
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    That's why I always get a permit, even if my shoot is not commercial in nature. It's free, same day and when anyone 'in authority' approaches, I pull that out and they walk away. Total 'hassle' = 1 minute. I don't have the patience to go through the hoops whether it's 'right' or not.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  9. #29
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    A free NYC tripod permit doesn't apply, however, if you happen to be shooting in a State Park.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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