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  1. #1

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    Nepal - travelling there for a month - need info

    Hi there,

    I have organised to go to Nepal for a month from October 28 this year.

    As a photographer, is there anything i need to keep in mind?

    I am quite looking forward to shooting the 100+ rolls of Kodachrome i have. I decided to keep a lot of this film especially for the trip - my own little Kodachrome project


    Your help is greatly appreciated


    Andrew Kirkby

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    If I remember correctly, there is a NZ photographer who went to Nepal last year and he said that there is a Lab there that processes film up to
    4x5. So if you want to take B&W film along you should be set. I don't know if they do prints though.
    Mike

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    I'm not going to need any processing or anything like that. That will either be done by myself, Stephen Frizza (lab) or Dwayne's once i get back to Australia.

    My main concern is rules and regulations regarding photography and anything to look for and see while i am there.

    AK

  4. #4
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Stephen Frizza processes Kodachrome...!? That's interesting. Very interesting.

    Ask before photographing Monks or the sacred places; in many places some sort of payment is expected (very tourist-savvy!). Dress should be neat casual and nothing speaking "money" should be overtly visible. Keep cameras etc out of sight until you actually use them. The Lonely Planet Guide Nepal is a must-read and will give you the fine print on local laws, customs and festivals.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Stephen Frizza processes Kodachrome...!? That's interesting. Very interesting.

    Ask before photographing Monks or the sacred places; in many places some sort of payment is expected (very tourist-savvy!). Dress should be neat casual and nothing speaking "money" should be overtly visible. Keep cameras etc out of sight until you actually use them. The Lonely Planet Guide Nepal is a must-read and will give you the fine print on local laws, customs and festivals.
    I am not only shooting Kodachrome. I suspect i will go through some E100VS and Velvia too. Stephen has E6 and C41 dip and dunk machines, so that film will go there.
    Kodachrome to Dwayne's.

    I'm going to grab a copy of the Lonely Planet guide.

    Have you been?

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    You could save yourself the often considerable expense of a Lonely Planet guide by getting one at your usual Library. You'll also find it handy to have it ready 'out there'. Subscribe to Lonely Planet updates to get the most recent addendums to whichever guide you have.

    I travelled with World Expeditions in 2004 (10 day Kathmandu Explorer, similar to the their current Nepal Special ) and this is probably the best way to go — leaving logistics, administration, passports etc and accommodation to a business well-versed familiar with the area.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  7. #7

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    I'm actually using a company down in Melbourne www.everesttrekking.com.au - they are sorting out pretty much everything for me - flights, accomodation, guides and visas etc. Far less hassle than doing this myself. Kath there has been very helpful indeed.

    Thanks for your advice, i'm going to track that book down tomorrow morning before work



 

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