Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,821   Posts: 1,581,870   Online: 1106
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,185
    Images
    2
    Take both -- what's a few more ounces? If weight is really an issue don't take extra shoes or something else. If you can absolutely take only one lens take the wide and crop. A tripod would be a plus if you can take it. In Utah beside Zion and Bryce go to Moab there is a wealth of photo opportunities there and nearby such as Dead Horse Point, Arches, Natural Bridges, Newspaper Rock, Hovenweep, Monument Valley and others.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  2. #12
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,752
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post


    You know you're going to have to go around Yosemite and enter from the west, right? The Tioga Pass road virtually never opens before mid-May, and sometimes not until June.

    -NT
    And it's a fairly heavy snow year.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North America just north of that sharp right turn North America makes on the Atlantic coast.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    602
    If this is the only camera you are taking I would forget angle and think about distance, any lens can focus at infinity, but if you are doing a one camera one lens trip you want something that can focus across a table, and maybe inside a car. Yes the American West is grand and beautiful, but so are the people you will be traveling with.

    I travel with a pocket Brownie for Medium format, and a Nikon 35mm with a Tamron 28-200 attached, I have a Nikon 28-200 that is 1/5 of a stop faster, but the Tamron focuses down to about .3 Meters and the Nikon only works at a little over a Meter. I learned that the Tamron lens is not quite as good as the Nikon when it comes to sharpness, but for taking photos of family, signs, details, plants, and anything that I can't photograph at over 1 Meter the Tamron is the way to go.

    Lets just say a family vacation with lots of great photos of the sights is less fun than a family vacation with photos of the family being silly and doing family type things.

    Learn from my mistake and bring the lens that will work close as well as far.

    If you are bringing a snapshot camera for photos of the family then take the 55 for your scenic work.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  4. #14
    Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,493
    Images
    30
    Having photographed those areas quite a bit, the 80mm might not be a bad choice. The wider angles are tough in Yosemite as well as Death Valley, mostly because you get so much sky and foreground that it detracts (kinda unusual) from the larger scene. Death Valley is a strange place because it's the only place I can recall where I wanted the longest lens possible.

    Utah, on the other hand, needs a wider lens for most of the grander areas, although the 80mm would be more than enough for things like Delicate Arch, Island in the Sky, and Powell.

    Buy a copy of Desert Solitaire and take Abbey's advice, get out of the goddamn automobile and use your feet. Then the angle of the lens is less of an issue
    K.S. Klain

  5. #15
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    772
    Images
    19
    When ever I travel or anything the only lens that comes with me is a 80. It is very versitile.

  6. #16
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,509
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    Let me re-state for emphasis:
    DO NOT CHECK YOUR CAMERA IN CHECKED BAGGAGE. CARRY IT ON THE PLANE WITH YOU.
    DO NOT CHECK YOUR CAMERA IN CHECKED BAGGAGE. CARRY IT ON THE PLANE WITH YOU.
    DO NOT CHECK YOUR CAMERA IN CHECKED BAGGAGE. CARRY IT ON THE PLANE WITH YOU.
    DO NOT CHECK YOUR CAMERA IN CHECKED BAGGAGE. CARRY IT ON THE PLANE WITH YOU.
    DO NOT CHECK YOUR CAMERA IN CHECKED BAGGAGE. CARRY IT ON THE PLANE WITH YOU.

    If for some reason you cannot carry it on with you, send it ahead to your destination via FedEx or DHL or some such courier that works for you. Putting a camera in checked baggage is tantamount to approaching a stranger on the street and asking them to watch it for you for the next twelve hours.

    That said, I'd take the 80mm if you must take only one lens. I agree with the sentiment that out there, in the Sierras and Death Valley, the lens that works best is the longest.

  7. #17
    ruilourosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Portugal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    303
    My advice:


    stay at home thinking about it
    vive la resistance!

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,527
    Images
    65
    If you check it, make sure you insure it for full value! I have had to check cameras, and insurance makes sure that it gets there safely or I get reimbursed for my loss.

    PE

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    Actually, I have found normal and telephoto lenses to be of the most use when shooting in the U.S. National Parks. In those locations, wides can easily make things too small on the neg, and give you a bunch of stuff you do not want in the frame. My C series kit when I go on road trips to the Parks is a 55, an 80, and a 180. The 55 gets used, but not as often as the others, and more for pictures of close objects, rather than grand panoramas.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,552
    Images
    90
    [QUOTE=ntenny;1159731...There's a temptation to use the wide angle to "get it all in", and there's so much "all" out in the Great Basin that one often ends up with photos that try to swallow everything and end up being about nothing....

    -NT[/QUOTE]

    +1

    I also agree that the checked baggage is a really bad place for your cameras unless you have a really serious hard shipping case. Even then, you can't lock checked bags with locks the TSA (or pretty much anyone else) can't open.

    If you're flying directly into LV, it may not matter much since you'll have them open for customs anyway. If you have a domestic US leg in your itinerary though, you won't be able to have the cases travel locked unless it's a "TSA" lock.

    Regarding the weather, it will be 80 F plus in Death Valley and the other areas of the Mojave, more like 90+ in May during the day. No one who lives there talks about "hot" until the temps exceed 110 (43 C).
    Last edited by bdial; 03-29-2011 at 06:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin