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  1. #1

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    going to Zion! What to take?!!!

    My head is about to explode trying to winnow down what to take and what to leave.
    We are doing a RV trip to Zion, Bryce and whatever else we can get to.

    Here's the list

    5d mk 2 for video and color shots with 3 L primes

    Bronica SQ with 80 and maybe the 50 for BW and or color

    Mamiya 646 with 80 same uses as Bronica

    Canon 1n .

    I'm thinking go with the 5D/1n set up cause I can use the same lenses. BW only for the film body.

    But, I want a med format rig.

    Which means 3 rigs. I don't want to overthink and overload....which is my default.

    Any advice would be great.


    Thanks,
    Echard

  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Frankly, two systems is almost overload, but if you must, and you think the video is that important, I'd take the 5D and the Bronica or the 5D and the 1N. If not, then I'd just take the Bronica. Otherwise you'll be spending all your time switching between cameras and switching between still and video and never actually photograph or record a thing because you'll either miss the shot or you'll come back with a lot of really mediocre stuff because your head was in the other zone every time you lifted one kind of camera to your face. It was tough enough for me when I went to Argentina with the Contax G1 and just two lenses for color street shooting and the Canham 5x7 for black-and-white.

  3. #3

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    Good advice. You hit the nail on the head. I really want to take as little as possible. I just want to have some BW film in one body so I can have some prints to make this winter. I'm leaning to the 5D and bronica or 1n. And, I'll also have a Lumix PS too. Video is not really a huge priority. I just started messing with it.

  4. #4

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    I think that the idea of having too many systems is wrong is not always right. In June my wife and I went to Yellowstone and Gran Teton and took Pentax digital and film, a Hasselblad, a 4X5 and a Nikon digital. The Nikon due to having borrowed a long lens that I do not have for the Pentax. But it was not difficult walking about with a tripod and the Hasselblad and having the Pentax digital in the bag for when I needed it (and was able to share lenses with my wife so did not need to carry as many as if I was the only one shooting). And the LF came out for certain shots in an area that I knew I wanted to use it. We were tenting it out of a RAV so less room than most RVs. In your case I think the Bronica and the 645 are too close to the same that you could leave one behind but if you took the digital Canon and the Bronica, how much room does a film body and a few rolls of 135 take? You might have to make some decisions when you start your hike or leaving the RV in the morning but they are not that difficult to make and you will not have the regrets afterwards. In my case I did not use the Pentax film camera that much but I did have a specific purpose in mind and the camera took up about the space of 6 granola bars.

  5. #5
    daleeman's Avatar
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    When I went in 2007 I took my Hasselblad with 80mm and a Leica M camera with 21mm, 50,mm and 90mm. Spent too much time getting out of the car and thinking, reloading the walking vest and it just added confusion. Took better shots with the 500cm and 80mm. took both Fuji 160 color neg and Ilford Delta 100 film. I would have never gone there without a back up camera of some kind. so enjoy the trip.

    Zion is a wonderful place, fell deeply in love with my girlfriend there and from then on knew she would be my wife; when we were in the Courtyard of the Patriarchs. And as of 1 November 2008 she is my wife and we have pictures of Zion all over the house.

    Lee

  6. #6
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Take the Bronica with two backs, a polarising filter plus the usual yellow & orange filters. Use 77mm filters and a 67mm->77mm step ring and then you're covered for both lenses.

    Don't forget the tripod and cable release and take plenty of film.

  7. #7

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    Zion is one of the most beautiful places on earth. However, one thing to keep in mind, is that there is no car traffic allowed in the park - you will have to take the shuttle bus to get into the park. Get a good comfortable backpack for your food, water and cameras. If you are planning to hike the narrows, you will get plenty of opportunities to drop your things into the river. For that particular hike I'd recommend a camera that will not start sparking underwater, or at least you won't feel too bad if it gets splashed along the way ;-). A water-proof bag with easy access to the camera would be very helpful there.
    Most of the things in Zion are some hike away. Think about what you are willing to carry for a few miles with large elevation gain.

    Have fun, you'll love the place!

  8. #8

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    Both Bryce and Zion are spectacular. If you have access to a longer than 80mm lens I would take that plus the 50. Personally, I am satisfied with B&W so I took two Hasselblad bodies, my 50 and 150 plus a 2x. Ilike to have both loaded with the same film (Ilford Delta 400 -- depth of field is important to me) as I like to stop down. A light but sturdy tripod is a must. I'm not keen on polarizing filters but I took a yellow, orange, light orange and light green. A spot meter and cable release. Carry all in a camera backpack if possible.

    Bryce is high desert going down into the canyon is easy but remember ... he who goes down also has to climb up. Especially in Bryce I suggest getting up before sunup and catch the very early light. It is almost like going to another planet. If you have the time Capitol Reef and Moab and environs are also great. We have been out there three times and I would gladly go again. Do some internet research if you have not already done so. There are MANY wonderful sights in that general area. The drive from Tropic to Torrey through the Escalante Preserve is one of the best scenic drives in the country.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  9. #9

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    I feel your pain. I struggle with the same issue. Take em all, but try to play with one at time? You'll soon sort it out.

  10. #10

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    I've been to both locations.

    One thing to keep in mind is that those two locations are very touristy. Buses bring in tourists by, well, busloads and common areas are pretty busy. Unless you go in odd hours or deep into the canyons, there will be people everywhere. While not exactly a dangerous (people wise) place, you won't be over burdened with equipment either. I wouldn't be surprised if you set something down, and get distracted by needing to set something up or mistakenly walk away, things might just disappear. Something to think about.

    When I was there, I had more needs for wide than long lens.

    If it were me, I'd take one digital and one B&W film (that's how I operate) both with wide to normal zoom or prime. Then I'd probably take orange or red filters for B&W work. I'd take one path with the former, then come back for later. For some reasons, I can only do one media type (color or b&w) at a time. If I try to do both by switching often, I tend to produce very mediocre images. I don't know about you.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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