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  1. #31

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    18 ROLLS!! IN 1 DAY! Wow that in it's self could be a challenge? (24 or 36 exp?)
    The Holga is a 120 camera... I'll modify it to shoot 6x6 as most people do. Therefore I'll be shooting 12 exposures per roll of 120.

    (It's only 216 exposures... The same as 6 rolls of 36)

    joe

  2. #32
    rogueish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Symchyshyn
    The Holga is a 120 camera... I'll modify it to shoot 6x6 as most people do. Therefore I'll be shooting 12 exposures per roll of 120.

    (It's only 216 exposures... The same as 6 rolls of 36)

    joe
    In the words of Homer "DUH!" :o
    I knew a holga was 120, but... well... I don't know, just not here in my head this morning...

  3. #33

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    Noseoil, Head for seven falls. Up Sabino Canyon. It's a nice hike too, but I was there in the spring.

    Everyone. I never said you had to step out of the box just that it was good to on occasion.

    It is funny that with all of the talk, from members about doing different things and being "creative artists", those talkers have not chimed in. Of course I might be on their ignore list. SO, Grace and Jay, let's hear form you. Maybe your thoughts could help someone who is struggling to find something new.

    Jay, before you think this is combative or not serious or rude, it is not intended. I am honestly interested in your's and Grace'e opinions.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  4. #34

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    In case you are on their ignore list... I'll repost it as a quote. Unless of course I'm on their ignore list as well... Hmmmmm...

    It is funny that with all of the talk, from members about doing different things and being "creative artists", those talkers have not chimed in. Of course I might be on their ignore list. SO, Grace and Jay, let's hear form you. Maybe your thoughts could help someone who is struggling to find something new.

    Jay, before you think this is combative or not serious or rude, it is not intended. I am honestly interested in your's and Grace'e opinions.
    I think that it's easy to say you want something, it's much harder to actually make the changes you seek.

    joe

  5. #35
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    Personally, I just believe the whole point of photography is to release the shutter. Everything else is trivial.
    I don't want to be vague but compared to other arts, let's say music or painting or sculpture that instanteneous immidiacy is the soul of photography. Even with a 8x10" Large Format camera and a posed scene, the approach is closer to a quick line drawing than sculpting the work.
    Which comes to the less vague point:
    I have millions of ideas but always comes to down to what do I do when I have my finger on the shutter. I can plan and sketch and design before hand, get the right lens, the right film, the right filter, pose the subject if I can, but when my eye gets in the viewfinder and connects with what the camera sees time stops and only my index finger can resume it.
    As it happens with my clay sculpture and charcoal drawing and japanese calligraphy I have a conversation with the materials. They talk to me and I listen to them and we create the artwork together, in some cases, this whole interraction is in milliseconds, almost instinctual.
    But then again I was never a very stractured kind of guy.
    So, being very new in photography and still just playing around without really doing artwork, I give myself projects, many times covering known methods of work, such as doing HCB-style street shots, Ansel Adams landscapes and so on.
    At the moment I have been trying sensual glamour, street work and LF-like landscapes and still life.
    Sometimes stepping in the box takes you out of it.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  6. #36

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    my ears pricked up today in a meeting, and I thought I would repeat what was said. I thought it was interesting. In the middle of talking about staff issues and talking about thinking inside/outside the box, one of the people said:

    "What we really need is people who think as if there isn't a box".

    On reflection I thought that this was actually interesting. What this person was talking about was people who use the appropriate solution for a problem, one that can be traditional or innovative, one that is the best.

    Should work for all of us, and anyway, made the meeting a little more intellectually interesting,
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  7. #37
    papagene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by livemoa
    "What we really need is people who think as if there isn't a box".
    David,
    I like this quote very much. I think the statement "Think Outside the Box" is such an overused and abused phrase. I have never liked boxes, too confining for me.

    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  8. #38

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    Box? What box? I don't know if I even found the box yet. I've done 35mm through 8x10. I've done portraits (some for pay), landscapes (not a big strength for me), still life, black and white, color, alternative process, astrophotography, Polaroid, macro, etc. Sometimes I scale new heights of mediocrity There have been too many different and new things to try. Maybe I'm just dancing around the box.
    Anyway, if someone picks a specialty and is good at it, what's the problem? People do majestic (or not) landscapes because they like to. Others do portraits (flattering or not) because they like to. Eventually they become very good at their chosen specialty. Isn't that better than all of us running around like first year students, desparately trying to be "original" and just churning out garbage?

  9. #39
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    This thread ties in nicely with the thread asking "Is there anything you wouldn't photograph?"

    Since I was 12, I shot more or less the same old, same old - school stuff, university stuff, general street scenes, landscapes, buildings, etc... I always shot 35mm film. Then a couple of years ago, I bought a Hassey. That square shape made me think about composition more. The 'slowness' of capturing a scene with a MF made think even more about the picture. Then I started into shooting 'purdy girls' when A friend of mine asked to shoot pics for her modelling portfolio and that ballooned. Fashion/glamour photography has so many 'rules', and so since I wasn't a professional, I broke every one - on purpose.

    Then I got into a discussion about photography, ethics, what to shoot, out-of-the-box stuff, rules, etc... Now, I want to shoot stuff that would make most uncomfortable. Why? I don't know why. Maybe I want to ask myself, why does it make me uncomfortable in the first place? Was it socialization? Was it an inherent mechanism to divide doing good from doing bad? I don't know.

    Talk about stepping out of the box. I'd pay to be a photographer in Iraq, Ivory Coast, first at the scene of a blood bath, or part of a forensic investigation. I'd love to document a person's life for a week - sort of reality TV in print. I like the idea of shooting street scenes using only a 28mm lens or wider - you have to get into strangers faces and how would I do that? I have captured my friends and family in their moments of joy, happiness, pride - weddings, births, graduations, etc... - I want to capture them in their moments of grief, despair and sorrow. I'd like to capture moments of extreme privacy and intimacy - not faked - but real.

    Lastly, I'd like to photograph myself. I think this is the biggest step outside a box for a photographer. I dont know how I'm going to do this without it being somewhat staged, but I'll figure that out as I go.

    This is my project for 2005. Really, REALLY stepping out of the box.

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  10. #40
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    Maybe the chijuaua from the Taco Bell commercial was right...

    "I theeenk we need a beeeeger box..."

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